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How to Succeed As A Screenwriter

trumbo image

Trumbo

A blacklisted Hollywood screenwriter fights back after being jailed for his political beliefs in Trumbo, now on DVD and Digital HD, from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. Inspired by the colorful life and legacy of the brilliant Oscar®-winning screenwriter Dalton Trumbo (Roman Holiday, Spartacus), Trumbo is an astonishing portrait of an often forgotten chapter of American history. A sharp and timely true Hollywood story, the riveting biographical drama is directed by Emmy Award® winner Jay Roach (HBO’s “Recount,” “Game Change”) and features Emmy and Tony®-winning actor Bryan Cranston.

In 1947, Dalton Trumbo (Bryan Cranston) was Hollywood’s top screenwriter until he and other artists were jailed and blacklisted for their political beliefs. Trumbo (directed by Jay Roach) recounts how Dalton used words and wit to win two Academy Awards and expose the absurdity and injustice of the blacklist, which entangled everyone from gossip columnist Hedda Hopper (Helen Mirren) to John Wayne, Kirk Douglas and Otto Preminger. The film also stars Diane Lane, John Goodman, Louis C.K., Elle Fanning, and Michael Stuhlbarg.

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Trumbo is a critically acclaimed film, nominated for an Academy Award® for Best Actor (Bryan Cranston), as well as two Golden Globes®, three SAG Awards, and three Critics Choice Awards.

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Star Wars

Star Wars: Episode VIII, began principal photography at Pinewood Studios in London on February 15, 2016. Star Wars: Episode VIII, which is written and directed by Rian Johnson and continues the storylines introduced in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, welcomes back cast members Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, Adam Driver, Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, Oscar Isaac, Lupita Nyong’o, Domhnall Gleeson, Anthony Daniels, Gwendoline Christie, and Andy Serkis. New cast members will include Academy Award® winner Benicio Del Toro, Academy Award® nominee Laura Dern, and talented newcomer Kelly Marie Tran.

FRANCESCA

Star Wars: Episode VIII is produced by Kathleen Kennedy and Ram Bergman and executive produced by J.J. Abrams, Jason McGatlin and Tom Karnowski. Joining the production crew will be some of the industry’s top talent, including Steve Yedlin (Director of Photography), Bob Ducsay (Editor), Rick Heinrichs (Production Designer), Peter Swords King (Hair and Make-Up Designer), and Mary Vernieu (US Casting Director). They will be joining returning crew members Pippa Anderson (Co-Producer, VP Post Production), Neal Scanlan (Creature & Droid FX Creative Supervisor), Michael Kaplan (Costume Designer), Jamie Wilkinson (Prop Master), Chris Corbould (SFX Supervisor), Rob Inch (Stunt Coordinator), Ben Morris (VFX Supervisor), and Nina Gold (UK Casting Director).

Star Wars: Episode VIII is scheduled for release December 15, 2017.

How to Succeed In Hollywood

Bruce Edwin is CEO of the A-list firm Starpower Management LLC, publisher of The Hollywood Sentinel, and also a film producer. His services, based on his years of expertise and success in the music and film industry are sought out and used by some of the most powerful companies and stars in entertainment. This ongoing article series, a precursor to his upcoming book, is his way of giving back to models, actors and bands, with free education- that in its totality and with its unabashed honesty- cannot not be found anywhere else. Free.

How to Succeed As A Screenwriter

1, Know your place and pay your dues by showing respect until you make it big. Until you are an Oscar nominated or Golden Globe nominated or winning screenwriter, realize that the production companies and producers, directors don’t need you, you need them. Don’t act like you are doing them a favor by sending your material or trying to get them to receive it.

2, Be prepared and follow directions given. When a producer or production company has agreed to look at your work, don’t argue or delay. Have ready exactly what they want, which may include a logline, a 1 page synopsis, a 10 page or more treatment, or the full script. Don’t ask them if you can send more than what they ask for, and definitely do not send something not asked for without the OK. This is a good way to get rejected before you even get your material read. Have everything ready right away, so that when they ask for it, you are prepared to send it and send it quickly. I had one screenwriter send me a full script, after I told him to only send me a one page synopsis. That is a quick way to get rejected. If one cannot follow directions on a simple document to send, one can not be expected to follow directions on a more serious and detailed matter like revising a script to someone’s specifications that is paying them. Follow directions.

3, Don’t ask questions before you are hired. After they are looking, or even before they agree to look, don’t ask them questions, which could waste their time and annoy them. A writer recently asked me– when I was going to read some of his work, what the difference was between an agent and a manager, in addition to about a half a dozen other questions, which I simply had no time for. Had he actually researched The Hollywood Sentinel ‘Archives,’ section, or even done a search to this answer online, he would have found the answer to this first question without attempting to waste our time. This is not a question to bother a producer, agent, or manager with. We don’t work on commission for no money down to educate people for free. Although I do educate people for free, when one is trying to get us to rep them, that is not the time to ask questions that one can easily find out on their own. Until you have a contract offer, don’t even hit people up with questions or you could kill the deal.

Can you imagine a guy meeting a girl, and wanting to ask her out, and then saying to her, so, “Will you make out with me a lot?” “Are you a good cook?” “Are you going to treat my children well?” No, she has not even said she will go out with him yet! Don’t do that! it’s too early.

So, when someone is looking or considering looking at your deal, it is not the time to ask them about their percentages, films funded, etc. If you don’t trust their expertise, don’t contact them to begin with, and when you do contact them, asking money questions prior to them even saying they are interested in not appropriate, unless again, you are already a top winning or top nominated screenwriter, in which case you will already have a top agent or top manager, which would mean you would not be asking the wrong questions, the agent or manager would be asking the questions for you, in the right manner.

4, When opportunity knocks, answer the freaken’ door and don’t send them running. One writer had a handful of scripts I was strongly considering representing. I sent him a short contract, and he told me that he needed over month to get back with me to ‘consider’ our deal. He claimed he needed several weeks for his attorney to look it over, and at least several weeks for him to film a webisode, which would include an extra week or so for camping. I told him that was fine, but that I would probably not be interested in giving him more than 10 business days, and that if he considered our business a priority, he could rush his attorney a bit, get a faster one, or cut his camping trip short, if he got no reception in the woods. He refused, and so I rescinded any and all future interest since he did not jump at the huge opportunity we were giving him. He was shocked, even though I gave him ample time to change his mind and move quicker. Over a year has passed, and no one has heard of this guy since, and my guess is, probably never will. When you have an A-list deal fall on your lap, do all you can to make it happen as fast as you can, and show them that you are eager, and appreciative. If you delay, you may delay your success for ever.

5, Thank the person! If you get an call or visit or e-mail from a top producer, agent, manager, or director, thank them for their time! My first test of whether or not I will deal with someone, is their manners or lack thereof. I have major investors– worth millions to sometimes even billions of dollars, that graciously thank me for my time, simply because they are classy ladies and gentleman, and are highly cordial and polite, when in fact, I should be the one thanking ‘them,’ and I always do. So when a writer hears from me, and does not thank me for my time, or show gratitude, I automatically lose all respect and interest.

6, Use the persons name, and address them as Mr. or Ms. unless they tell you to otherwise. Show respect. Just when I think I’ve seen it all, I often experience some other scenario that tops the rest in all manners of ridiculousness. As an example, another writer recently contacted me with no thank you, and actually instead of calling me by any part of my name, addressed me as the letter ‘B’! Not only is this lazy, it’s foolish. Pretend you are communicating with the person face to face. Show respect, and use their name.

7, Don’t give orders. If you are trying to get someone to do something for you, or to communicate with you, or return your communication, ask them, don’t order. Most rich or powerful people have worked very hard to get where they are at, and a part of that freedom they enjoy is not having to take orders from anyone. So, if someone gives them an order, especially when that person is trying to get a favor out of ‘them,’ they can generally forget a deal ever happening. Ask, don’t demand! And that’s an order! (LOL).

8, Answer your phone, and answer blocked calls. Any time someone that wants me to do something spends their time telling me about how they did not answer my call, because they don’t answer blocked calls, not only wastes my time, but sends me the signal that they are either A, control freaks, B, paranoid, or C, have bill collectors after them. I have told this story over and over, but unfortunately, it is one that needs repeating. Atlantic Records called me one time from New York, and the publicist there told me, “Bruce, record labels and film studios, we all call from private, blocked, or even dummy numbers. So if you want to be successful working in Hollywood in the music and film biz, answer private calls!”

I told this story about the blocked line and dummy number to an actress I represented once who was not answering our blocked line, and she asked me if I was calling her a dummy. I had to think about that one. I thanked this person at Atlantic Records for that advice, and always took it, and it was true. Every film studio lot I have had an office at, has phones that we had to use through the studio that had automatically programmed private or dummy numbers. The record labels are no different. This has been this way for ages, and is to protect producers and top level industry people from stalkers, and is also so we can better control our communication and ‘roll calls’ without interruptions we don’t want, controlling communication on our terms. So, answer your phone, and always answer private calls or numbers you don’t know and don’t complain about it. Complaining about this does not impress anyone, on the contrary, it will only show that you have no experience in dealing with the entertainment industry.

9, Don’t describe your film as a cross between one film and another, unless you are asked to compare it. One writer I know just emailed me a synopsis and described his film as when one title meets another certain film. The first film he mentioned I had never even seen, not liking the actor in the film, and the second film he compared his script to, I had seen, and after reading his script, found this comparison totally wrong, being nothing like the film mentioned. Further, why be ‘like’ another film anyway? Be original, and don’t compare your script to anything else unless you have to.

10, Don’t send producers you are working with or want to work with countless re-writes! One writer I am dealing with is constantly sending me revised versions of his script, which I simply have no time to read. Then, one funding source will have one version, and another funding source ends up with another version, then when we go back to discuss it, it has totally changed, and is a complete mess. This is a sign of an unprofessional screenwriter. turn in a final draft, and stick to it, unless you are asked to change it otherwise.

11, Proofread! I got another writer that sent me a script in with a ton of typographical errors. He had the audacity to tell me I could clean them up. No! That is not a producers job, it’s the screenwriters. Make sure that your script is perfect, and error free.

12, Don’t try to act like a producer on a film when you are not the producer, and are the screenwriter only. Your job is essential and important. I am not demeaning that job whatsoever. Just don’t try to overstep your boundary and act like a line producer or producer unless you actually are one, and have been retained by the owner or producer of the deal to work in this additional capacity.

I hope this has helped many of you. As always, if you have any questions, you are invited to contact me at the front page of this site.

The office of Bruce Edwin and Starpower Management accepts screenplays from Academy Award or Golden Globe winning or nominated screenwriters only.

This content is © 2016, The Hollywood Sentinel, Bruce Edwin, all rights reserved. Special thanks to Universal Studios and Skywalker Ranch.

Diversity, Professionalism, and Inclusion

By Moira Cue

Does your organization practice diversity, professionalism, and inclusion? I would argue that each of these values represents a level of commitment to the same core principal, in ascending order of ethical strength and subtlety. While each value has its place in the contemporary work world, I believe that inclusion is the most important goal to strive for.

Diversity and professionalism can be stepping stairs on the upward path to inclusion, but only if leadership is self-motivated to engage in constant questioning of the status quo. The danger in the “step-by-step” approach is that each step can become a plateau, wherein the organization becomes comfortable at one level and doesn’t go any farther.

Title: "Sojourner Truth," Other Title, "I sell the shadow to support the substance" Summary: Photograph shows Sojourner Truth, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing slightly left. Created / Published c1864. Subject Headings - Truth, Sojourner,-- 1799-1883. Format Headings, Albumen prints--1860-1870. Cartes de visite-- 1860-1870. Portrait photographs--1860-1870. - Copyright 1864 by Sojourner Truth. - Purchase;--William A. Gladstone;--1995;--(PR 13 CN 1995:113)
Title: “Sojourner Truth,” Other Title, “I sell the shadow to support the substance.”  Summary: Photograph shows Sojourner Truth, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing slightly left. Created / Published c1864. Subject Headings – Truth, Sojourner,–1799-1883. Format Headings, Albumen prints–1860-1870. Cartes de visite–1860-1870. Portrait photographs–1860-1870. – Copyright 1864 by Sojourner Truth.-Purchase;–William A. Gladstone;–1995;–(PR 13 CN 1995:113)

An organizational commitment to diversity often focuses on hiring and retention statistics and avoiding legal liability. Adopting policies such as mandatory sexual harassment training for managers, hiring targets for minorities, participation in surveys, and official diversity committees out of fear reduces diverse people, including women, to statistical targets at best; and potential fires to be handled with caution, at worst. It seems true that you can’t improve what you don’t measure. It is also true that quantifiable results, such as the number of African-Americans on your Board of Directors, or the presence or absence of discrimination lawsuits, are the fruits of a particular work culture, leadership attitude, and environment. The root of the problem is deeply held, even subconscious, beliefs of not only the people “in charge,” but the people who come to work for your organization with prior experiences of victimization or discrimination based on their identity. If the main reason you or your leadership engage in a particular course of action is to not get sued, or to decrease future financial loss after a successful suit, than that action is reactive rather than proactive, and your organization should consider moving up the ethics ladder to review and address matters of professionalism from a more holistic vantage point.

On the other hand, there are cases wherein a formal investment in diversity programs signifies progress. Is if your organization refuses to review its own diversity metrics (at least internally); has been the subject of an EEOC disciplinary action or investigation; or has problems retaining women and diverse people at upper levels or with retention in general, then looking at the metrics is a good place to start. If there is no prominent member of your organization who is not white and male and/or from an Ivy League school, certainly you might want to bring in a consultant to ask why that is, and keep an open mind. Don’t assume there is a lack of qualified people applying for jobs with your organization. Upper management or HR may not realize that compared to other organizations of your same size and industry, you have a higher or lower percentage of various ethnicities, so when you analyze the numbers you might see patterns that lead to more important questions. Is diversity not only a product of the organization, but of the industry itself? If so, what factors favor parity in one industry and not another?

There are entire industries that need to start with diversity: Look at the overall numbers in engineering (http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/wmpd/2013/tables.cfm). Or, closer to home for this author: Look at the numbers of contemporary (i.e. living) female artists exhibiting solo shows in major museums globally compared to the number of women who go through art schools (http://www.artnews.com/2015/05/26/taking-the-measure-of-sexism-facts-figures-and-fixes/). Worse yet, look at a historical list of the highest sales prices for paintings. There are no women artists represented in the top 65 individual sales, and only two men who are not European or American descent (both are Chinese). The most obvious answer to this question could be that one of these industries (engineering) enculturates its own with so called “left-brain,” solutions-based, rational thinking that tends to emphasize the calculating areas of our brains over the care and connectivity centers—so “leveling the playing field” is an alien concept when participants are less aware of the “field” as a sphere of human interaction and more aware of direct, concrete objectives. But art, which traditionally engages the “human story,” is simply a field (much like Hollywood) wherein there is no traditional employer-employee relationship for the makers of individual works of art (or music or entertainment), hence a field wherein threat of litigation plays little to no deterring role for exploitation, and individual personalities battle for “celebrity” status.

A culture that thrives on professionalism (or civility, if you prefer) would exclude cultural appropriation at the expense of the minority. It isn’t professional to boost yourself over others while trampling them under your feet. It isn’t professional to take credit for others accomplishments, pay a person less than she is worth because she lets you get away with it, use racial or sexual slurs, or make someone so uncomfortable that she drops out of your school or company. I’ve had the pleasure of working in organizations led by men, who happened to be white and well compensated, who had this kind of class. Because these leaders saw their subordinates as professionals first, it was easier to do my best work than in other environments where unprofessional and gendered comments were the norm.

But there’s still a higher plane of organizational virtue: inclusion. I often hear the words “diversity and inclusion” brandied about as painter Hedda Sterne famously heard the phrase “great artist,” as if one word. To me this is a pity, as I feel we lose so much of the value of inclusion when we look for diversity reductively or mechanistically. When we strive for diverse work forces, or to give diverse voices cinematic exploration, rather than inclusive work forces or works of art, we only go skin deep. There is an assumption that if a person isn’t a member of a protected class, he or she has never experienced discrimination. There’s an assumption that you can take a snapshot or run your metrics, and know if you are certifiably diverse. There’s an assumption that traditionally excluded people are being “let in” that smacks of paternalism. An inclusive approach throws all assumptions about identity out the window. It’s not management that defines the beingness of their employees by checking off boxes. An inclusive approach is one where real differences, as experienced by the Self, rather than culturally or politically constructed sociology of difference, are given room to be. A progressively inclusive workplace, for example, might create dim, quiet spaces for employees who are disturbed by bright lights or too much noise or accept an introvert’s desire to avoid the company picnic (regardless of disclosure or existence of a formal autism diagnosis). A progressively inclusive workplace would hire art school graduates or creative consultants and ask “how can we be more creative” during Board meetings. You would see not just different skin colors or sexual orientations, but different personalities, different politics, different religions, working together.

My personal working hypothesis regarding inclusion, perhaps due to indoctrination in, first, empiricism, and secondly, a “post-” everything ethos, is that the differences we don’t see—arbitrary epistemological boundaries—are more individualistic and profound than differences attributed to diverse variables. Though there is so much overlap that diverse variables become the simplest way of pre-judging others. By “arbitrary epistemological boundaries” I mean the invisible hierarchy of values which are unique to every field of knowledge as historically defined, without elimination of Western or ‘civilized’ bias. (Two excellent books exploring gender and nature, Carolyn Anne Merchant’s The Death of Nature, and Leonard Shlain’s The Goddess Versus the Alphabet, were key to my early inspiration in this regard as well.) Historical divisions between commercial activity and the academy, art and science, ethics and all other fields of endeavor, have created poly-fragmentated dissociation en masse. We go to work exclusively to make money. We go to school exclusively to learn. We make art exclusively to express ourselves. If we question the impact of any of these activities on non-human life, we have stepped outside of all -ologies other than ecology. Competition and cooperation have prescripted dominant-subordinate relationships in various settings.

Both in your individual success and the success of the organizations you influence, identifying the “invisible walls” more clearly and including ideas, modalities, and people “outside” those boundaries can yield adventure, discovery, and original ideas and combinations.

This story is ©2016, The Hollywood Sentinel, Moira Cue, all world rights reserved.

Hi! I’m all like…uh…socially awkward!

subnormal

Top 10 Best Bands of Our Time

The Countdown has Begun!

(in no particular order)

Yeah Yeah Yeahs

letter from the editor

I went to the famous rock club The Whisky a Go Go recently for one of my clients that I booked there, and I got talking to someone that really made me think about something important. This person stated to me, and I quote, “I’m sorry. I’m very–uh, socially awkward!” Wow! Now, I admit, when I was a teenager, I may have been a bit socially awkward too, by getting nervous around other kids that really impressed me. But, I would never tell them that I was socially awkward. Now, I suppose I could respect the fact that this person was at least self realizing enough to recognize this, and even brave enough to admit it. However, I have also learned over the years, that what we put our attention on, is usually what we get. If you go around telling everyone that you are socially awkward, well then, chances are, you probably will be. And even if you are not, and people are informed that you are, well then they will probably tend to think you are. The words we say and hear have power. Choose your words wisely. Speak of that which you wish to be. I’m not saying to go around lying and introducing yourself as a billionaire or superstar if you are not, but certainly don’t demean yourself to others, or to yourself.

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While modern technology has brought us many great things, it has also sadly eroded the intelligence of the average person. Note that I state average. I am not talking about the un-average, I am talking about the normal, usual, average person. Also notice that I didn’t just state the young person or today’s teenager. I don’t think its fair to single out an entire generation with generalities. I hated when people did that when I was a teenager, and I don’t believe in that now. There are some exceptional, un-average teenagers that do not fit into any statistical attempts at defining their generation. And there are people of every generation whose intelligence or learning growth has been eroded– not just teenagers– due to new technology.

Take driving for example. A large number of people text and drive, or at least talk on their cell and drive. This alone has caused more traffic accidents and fatalities throughout the world. This is stupid. Yet, like drunk driving, it still keeps happening. So called smart phones in general, have taken what was already a major distraction when at home–the internet on home computers, and turned it into a non stop distraction at home, school, work, at play, literally anywhere and everywhere.

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So called social media, which should actually be called anti-social media, has further eroded social development by addicting the masses to a digital, artificial reality of so called friends. People get upset when their so called FaceBook friends don’t ‘like’ their comments quick enough, or forbid, not at all. Going outside and actually engaging with real human beings face to face has become the exception, not the norm.

At parties, concerts, and other social or public events, places where people used to meet, mingle, and make friends has largely become places where room fulls of socially inept loners nervously fidget with their phones, pretending to stay busy. Apps for engaging with someone live with their faces on streaming video, has removed the need for some, the desire to even see a person face to face in real life, cutting down the three dimensional reality of a live human being in the flesh and blood before someone, to a mere video capture of them that can of course, always be manipulated, or hacked for the world to see.

Concert photography, once limited to valid, professional photographers, has denigrated to bands and most venues letting everyone take pictures of the artist at any time during the shows, which has resulted in the destruction of a natural crowd in the moment, enjoying the scene, to a crowd of wanna-be photographers and wanna be videographers destroying the vibe with their arms raised in the air, and bright cell lights illuminating what should be a dark concert hall, just waiting to get home and upload it to share with their other so called friends.

News stations and newspapers, who used to fact check and have journalistic standards, now simply copy verbatim, stories published on amateur blog sites written by people with no experience, and pass it off as news. When the mainstream, supposed respectable news sources don’t completely duplicate lies and posit its legitimacy, they get so scholarly as to tell us, ‘This story has not been verified for authenticity,’  yet report it anyway.

People, reading and watching news online, often consider it infallible. If its online, it must be true, some think. On the contrary, if it is online, it might ‘not’ be true, and one should find out as to whether it is real or not, by scholarly fact checking, themselves. And yet, only some of the college educated, properly taught how to do professional research, know how to find out the truth of something, based on scientific research. Thus, masses of people getting some, most or even all of their news from the internet are deluded into not knowing what is real, and having a false sense of truth and reality.

Laws against slander and libel, which used to be enforced in hard copy press, have no bearing in the digital domain, where anonymous hacks can call persons rapists, murderers, or criminals, whether true or not, and get away with it under the guise of freedom of speech. Criminal run blogs can extort money from attacked victims on their libel sites, and the government, busy committing their own crimes, does nothing.

Privacy violations, made publicly aware with the NSA computer spying, (popularized by rebels including Bradley Manning and Julianne Assange), which have always existed since computers existed, reminded us all that there largely is no privacy any more. Department stores, shopping centers, convenient marts, stop signs, traffic lights, and street corners often have cameras, recording our every move. Companies such as Google are simply like another branch of the government, used to monitor, and modify public opinion. Companies including FaceBook conducts social experiments to control what information gets posted in users ‘timelines,’ to control their mood, and monitor and sway their buying habbits.

Lastly, live social interaction has not only become more ‘awkward’ for multiple generations of internet addicted victims, it has declined. “People don’t go out more,” one hipster told me not long ago. “I can’t get my friends to leave the house,” another said, “They’re too lazy. They’d rather stay home and be on the internet.” All of this inactivity, has turned a generation of ‘couch potatoes,’ that at least used to get up once in a while, in to cross generational internet junkies, that don’t even need to leave home to go shopping. Countless record stores and book stores have shuttered their doors, going out of business, as movies and music are hacked or downloaded online, and new generations of children get fatter and fatter, not only becoming a social disgrace to be mocked and laughed at by the kids lucky enough to not get fat, but even worse, becoming a health casualty getting major diseases due to poor diet and inactivity.  Presidents’ wives take on America’s ‘fat epidemic,’ yet meanwhile, the same administration pushes to get computers in every home and school; as the arts, sports, and science classes get cut from educational programs nationwide, and cursive is dreadfully eliminated.

The failure to communicate with people in person has further– resulted in a fear of people, leading to increased anxiety, stress, paranoia, and ultimately, violence.  Idiots that have been dumbed down by TV, video games, and worse, chat rooms or social media, get in ‘flame wars,’ or simply begin engaging in ‘cyber bullying,’ leading to suicide among adolescents and teens.

Becoming bored, depressed, tense, or uneasy, tweaked out internet junkies get diagnosed by quack psychiatrists with the next new label, and doped up on the latest psychiatric pill peddled by Big Pharma. This of course, leads to more depression, violence, suicide, homicide, and those ever popular school shootings.

So while technology certainly has its good points, its points of abuse are not difficult to find. The moments when people introduced themselves with lines like, “I’m sorry, I’m uh, really socially awkward,” should be relegated to comedic films, not real life. Clearly, things need to change. So readers, I dare you, if you don’t already, pick a day, perhaps a Sunday or any other day you can, and avoid the cell phone. Avoid the internet. Stay off the computer. Stay away even from any other phone or T.V. and video games. Get outside. Meet people face to face. Demand they look at you instead of their phone. Make them listen. Listen to them. Shake some hands. Give a hug. Go climb a mountain. Swim in the Ocean. Take a walk in a park. Touch some trees. Enjoy nature. And leave– if for not longer– at least for one day, your phone and internet connection at home. And who knows, maybe one of these days, I just might un-plug things myself for longer than a few hours (after making the next issue here you must NOT miss) and join you.

– Bruce Edwin

This content is un-copyright, 2016, and may be duplicated in full only, for no profit, with hyperlink back to this site with full credit by the author.

subnormal magazine, 2016