Chris Cornell: Soundgarden–Remembered

The first time I heard Soundgarden, I was around 17. I later heard them more properly in my early 20’s at the legendary party house of “302,” in Normal, Illinois–land of ISU. To understand 302, all you need to know is this–you had to know someone to get in, or you had to look really cool. That meant–freaks, punk rockers, goth, death rockers, skinheads, new wavers, boarders, and the like were in–all others were out.  In the basement of 302, we would at times see bands including The Flaming Lips play just inches from us. It was here in the basement too, where each room was a different ‘theme,’ and where massive Marshall stack speakers blasted at top pro  sound quality and deafening volume, the latest of all the best music including everything from Jane’s Addiction, Metallica, and the Red Hot Chili Peppers, The Cure, The Smiths, and the Sex Pistols, to the more obscure My Life With the Thrill Kill Kult, Nitzer Ebb, Ministry, Killing Joke, Sisters of Mercy,  Reagan Youth, and more. Soundgarden was on regular rotation, and we all loved the band and recognized them as the greats that they were–including of course–Chris Cornell.  The frat houses played Zeppelin, we played Jane’s Addiction and Soundgarden.  Not that we didn’t appreciate and love Zeppelin, but we hit 304 (the 60’s and 70’s party next door) on another night. This was our generation–Soundgarden, Nirvana, Hole, Fugazi, and more.

To those that needed trendy labels, Soundgarden was a part of the so called Seattle grunge scene, along with Alice in Chains, Mudhoney, and Nirvana, among more. To the rest of us, they were just a great, no frills rock band that jammed like few others.

The loss of Chris Cornell–reportedly by suicide, is not only shocking and sad, it makes little sense. Perhaps his family and those others who knew and loved him can understand it, but the rest of the world do not. Some will argue his music and lyrics were dark–which they were. Yet he had a new tour underway, and a family he loved back home. Whether the rumor is true or not–suicide is never a solution. Soundgarden and Audioslave were legendary. Chris Cornell was a masterful talent with a soaring voice like none other.  Seattle is mourning with dimming of the Space Needle. The rest of the music world from all genres who knew and appreciated him are mourning too.  A greatly underappreciated artist in many respects, he will be forever remembered, and greatly missed.

–Bruce Edwin

Textual content copyright Bruce Edwin 2017, all rights reserved.

How to Succeed In Hollywood

Bruce Edwin is CEO of the A-list firm Starpower Management LLC, publisher of The Hollywood Sentinel, and also a film producer. His services, based on his years of expertise and success in the music and film industry are sought out and used by some of the most powerful companies and stars in entertainment. This ongoing article series, a precursor to his upcoming book, is his way of giving back to models, actors and bands, with free education- that in its totality and with its unabashed honesty- cannot not be found anywhere else. Free.

1, Never trust anyone completely.  In Hollywood, loyalty is often received by the person paying out the most money or making someone the biggest star the fastest, and even then one may get screwed.

2, Always get everything in writing, and don’t consider it valid unless it is in writing. Even then, remember, contracts are only as good as the people that sign them. If you don’t trust them, don’t sign.

3, If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is, unless it can be proven otherwise.

4, Be aware that the more successful you get, or even the more successful people ‘think’ you are, the more haters you will have, and the more there will be psychos and creeps lurking in the sewers plotting to try attack you–even when things seem nice and calm.  Bigger success or bigger ‘perceived’ success equals being a bigger target.

5, Have a good lawyer who knows entertainment law, and be ready to defend yourself when necessary.

6,  Never trust a junkie, or anyone whose eyes are spinning in circles like in those cartoons.

7, Never trust anyone or deal with anyone who brags about screwing people over, breaking contracts, or talking bad about everyone behind their back.

8, Never take too much advice from anyone who is less successful than you are.  Granted, we can learn from anyone, but choose your mentors wisely. We are reflection of the company we keep.

9, Don’t deal with anyone who is always making excuses, always late, or never shows up.

10, Don’t deal with a hothead person with a bad temper. One day, it will be  you they go off on and by then, it may be too late.

11, Be wary of someone who has sued a lot of people. Typically, these types are low life losers out to try make a fast buck or trying to get rich quick by abusing the legal system.

12,  Never deal with a liar. Those who are dishonest in word are generally dishonest in their actions too.

13, Read Books on how to do business and how to succeed in life. Read books about Hollywood and how it works. Read self help books such as “How to Win Friends and Influence People,” “Think and Grow Rich,” “The Four Agreements,” and “The Power of Now.” Train your mind and educate yourself daily.

14, Treat others how you yourself would like to be treated.

15, Be forgiving. If you are a malicious person who fails to forgive, be very aware that your karma will come back to crush you sooner or later–probably sooner.

I hope this has helped many of you. As always, if you have any questions, you are invited to contact me at the front page of this site.

This content is © 2017,  Hollywood Sentinel, Bruce Edwin, all rights reserved.

Moonlight: All That a Best Picture Should Be

Movie Review By Moira Cue

The minimalist beauty of the 89th Annual Academy Award for Best Picture, the film ‘Moonlight,’ is both elegiac and hopeful. In a world of poverty and violence, a richness of character, however flawed, shines transcendent.   This film is artful.  This film is all that a Best Picture should be.

Before ‘Moonlight’ received its Oscar nomination, the first person I know who saw it came back from the theater with her face aglow. “You have to go see it,” they stated.  “What’s it about?” I asked.  “You just have to go see it,” they replied.

Moonlight is a hero’s odyssey. The main character, Chiron, is the African-American son of a crack-addicted mother and target of bullying at his Miami school. The film is divided into the Greek three act structure, wherein Chiron is portrayed in glimpses as a young boy, teenager, and man. The name Chiron traces its origin to classic Greek mythology; Chiron was a civilized, intelligent centaur, who, in varying accounts, gave up his immortality.  (The character has been explored for millennia, in Greek and Roman mythology, in Dante’s Inferno, and Pulitzer Prize winning author John Updike’s novel The Centaur, which was set in the context of 20th-century small-town America.)

The cinematographer’s palette is exquisitely utilized. Pale sheets of color—Miami pastels—appear as washes that transform walls in Chiron’s mother’s low income housing into a vibratory entity similar to Rothko’s paintings.

The sound track includes contemporary classical music, rap, and an even an R&B song that echoes the sweet layered harmonies of the innocent 1950’s. The score’s disparate melodies all work together despite referencing different cultures and time periods.  There is so much beauty and so much pain.

This film is brutal, and timeless. While it is set in a world that most audience members would not voluntarily visit, it is universal in its depiction of a first, true love.

Everyone will remember the 89th Academy Awards because of the accidental announcement of ‘La La Land’ as Best Picture.  But ‘La La Land,’ with all the advantage of being a film by Hollywood about Hollywood, piled on the trappings of the Golden Era while having forgotten the old adage, all that glitters isn’t gold. While ‘La La Land’ tells us of love aborted for the cult of ambition; ‘Moonlight’ shows us a world where love is the only ambition.

Moira Cue is art and literature editor of Hollywood Sentinel, and an award winning multi-media artist working in art, music, film, and fiction among more. For more information on Moira visit the official website at www.MoiraCue.com

This content is copyright 2017, Moira Cue / Hollywood Sentinel, all world rights reserved.