Tag Archives: los angeles art

MOCA Selects former MoMA Curator as New Director

MOCA Director Klaus-Biesenbach; ©2018, MOCA, Photo Credit: Casey Kelbaugh

Following a wide-ranging international search, the Board of Trustees of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, today voted to appoint the internationally acclaimed museum director Klaus Biesenbach as MOCA’s next director.

A visionary museum leader, Biesenbach comes to MOCA from The Museum of Modern Art, New York, where he has served as director of MoMA PS1 and chief curator at large of MoMA since 2010.

During his leadership at the institution, the former P.S. 1 Center for Contemporary Art was transformed into the thriving MoMA PS1, with Biesenbach becoming known for championing emerging artists throughout the New York area, advocating for programs that made PS1 a gathering place for popular, multidisciplinary, in-the-moment artmaking and discussion.

During his tenure as director of MoMA PS1, the Board of Trustees was expanded from 11 to 30 members, and the budget more than doubled to accompany successful programmatic and institutional growth.

As director of MOCA, Biesenbach will assume executive leadership of one of the most important museums of contemporary art in the world, holding an extraordinary collection comprising more than 7,000 objects and a record of organizing international, diverse, ground‐breaking, and scholarly exhibitions.

MOCA is the only independent, artist‐founded museum in Los Angeles dedicated solely to collecting and exhibiting contemporary art.

Installation view of Selections from the Permanent Collection, September 13, 2016–
ongoing, at MOCA Grand Avenue, ©2018, courtesy of The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, photo by Brian Forrest.

In 2013, MOCA successfully completed an unprecedented endowment campaign to bring its endowment to over $100 million, and it now stands at over $130 million.

Maurice Marciano and Lilly Tartikoff Karatz, co-chairs of MOCA’s Board of Trustees, said, “On behalf of ourselves and the entire Board, we want to thank the search and selection committee, especially the artists, for bringing this process to such an outstanding conclusion. The Board is excited to welcome Klaus Biesenbach, one of the world’s most knowledgeable, wide-ranging, and innovative museum executives of contemporary art. We also extend our warmest appreciation to Philippe Vergne for his service to MOCA.”

Maria Seferian, president of MOCA’s Board of Trustees and chair of the search committee, said, “We are proud to have undertaken a thorough and international search, conducted with the indispensable participation of our artist trustees. The Board is aligned in our support of Klaus and thrilled that he has accepted our offer.”

Catherine Opie said, “It’s been crucial to me, Barbara Kruger, Mark Bradford, and Mark Grotjan, as some of the artists on the Board, that we’ve had a strong voice in the selection process. I want everyone in our community to know that we’re thrilled to have Klaus Biesenbach join us. He comes to MOCA with a level of mutual trust with artists that is crucial for everything this museum does today, and that we hope it will be able to do in the future.”

According to the New York Times, Deborah McLeod, director of the Beverly Hills branch of Gagosian stated that the hire of Klaus Biesenbach “radically good news,” and reportedly stating that “MOCA needs this level of organizational leadership and vision.”

Hollywood Sentinel Publisher Bruce Edwin, who also represents numerous Masterworks of fine art in private collection states, “I am very pleased about MOCA’s new appointment of Mr. Biesenbach. Like Jeffery Deitch before him, I think he has  great style and taste. I am excited to see the cool new shows that will be coming to MOCA thanks to Klaus’ extraordinary vision.” 

Klaus Biesenbach stated, “Like so many of my colleagues around the world, I have long seen MOCA as one of the most vital institutions in our field. It is humbling to be invited to lead a museum that has already achieved so much, and that in so many ways represents the highest aspirations of contemporary art. With my gratitude to the search committee and the entire Board of Trustees, I look forward to serving MOCA’s constituencies, its increasingly large and diverse public, the artists’ community, and of course all residents of Los Angeles to the very best of my abilities.”

Klaus Biesenbach began his career in Berlin as founder of Kunst-Werke (KW) Institute for Contemporary Art (1990) and the Berlin Biennale (1996), the exhibition that confirmed Berlin’s international reputation as a leading city where artists live and work.

He came to New York in 1995 to serve as curator at P.S. 1 Center for Contemporary Art (later MoMA PS 1). There, with Alanna Heiss, he created the Warm Up outdoor summer series of live and electronic music, which has been widely emulated by other museums around the world, co-founded the now-legendary Greater New York exhibition series, which showcases emerging talent from everywhere in the metropolitan region, and with former MoMA Associate Director Kathy Halbreich, established the popular, multidisciplinary Sunday Sessions, which are housed in the winter under a geodesic dome.

In 2006, he was named chief curatorial advisor at PS1 and founding Chief Curator of MoMA’s newly formed Department of Media, which he broadened through performance workshops and acquisitions, and, in 2009, he became founding Chief Curator of the Department of Media and Performance Art.

His performance workshop at MoMA, which brought together museum directors, curators, scholars, and artists, culminated in the acquisition of The Kiss by Tino Sehgal, the first completely immaterial work in MoMA’s collection, and the exhibitions of Tehching Hsieh and Marina Abramovic, which established performance art as one of the necessary disciplines in museums throughout the world. Biesenbach has pioneered the ongoing Rockaway! public arts festival in response to Hurricane Sandy, which has featured site-specific works by Janet Cardiff, Patti Smith, Katharina Grosse, and Yayoi Kusama, among others.

THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES (MOCA)

About MOCA: Founded in 1979, MOCA’s vision is to be the defining museum of contemporary art. In a relatively short period of time, MOCA has achieved astonishing growth with three Los Angeles locations of architectural renown; a world-class permanent collection of more than 7,000 objects, international in scope and among the finest in the world; hallmark education programs that are widely emulated; award-winning publications that present original scholarship; groundbreaking monographic, touring, and thematic exhibitions of international repute that survey the art of our time. MOCA is a not-for-profit institution that relies on a variety of funding sources for its activities.

Hours of Operation 

Hours: MOCA Grand Avenue (located at 250 South Grand Avenue in Downtown Los Angeles) is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 11am to 6pm; Thursday from 11am to 8pm; Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 5pm; and closed on Tuesday.

The MOCA Store at MOCA Grand Avenue is open Monday through Wednesday and Friday from 10:30am to 5:30pm; Thursday from 10:30am to 8:30pm; and Saturday and Sunday from 10:30am to 6:30pm.

The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA (located at 152 North Central Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012) has the same hours as MOCA Grand Avenue during exhibitions. Please call ahead or go to moca dot org for the exhibition schedule for The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA.

MOCA Pacific Design Center (located at 8687 Melrose Avenue, West Hollywood, CA 90069) is open Tuesday through Friday from 11am to 5pm; Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 6pm; and closed on Monday.

Museum Admission: General admission is free for all MOCA members.

General admission is also free for everyone at MOCA Grand Avenue and The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA on Thursdays from 5pm to 8pm, courtesy of Wells Fargo. General admission is always free at MOCA Pacific Design Center.

General admission at MOCA Grand Avenue and The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA is $15 for adults; $8 for students with I.D.; $10 for seniors (65+); and free for children under 12 and jurors with I.D.

More Information: For 24-hour information on current exhibitions, education programs, and special events, call 213-626-6222 or access MOCA online at www.moca.org

This content is  ©2018, Hollywood Sentinel and respective, noted content ©2018 MOCA with kind courtesy, all rights reserved.

L.A. Art Show Lifts Up the Spirit of 2017

Top row, left to right: Mother of Brooke, Kim Martindale (Producer/Partner: L.A. Art Show), Emma Roberts, Scott Diament (President/CEO) Palm Beach Show Group, Brooke (St. Jude), and VIP guests.

The now legendary L.A. Art Show is back.  After a strongly divided country emerges in to the new year after one of the most heated Presidential races in American history, The L.A. Art Show launched last night into 2017 with perhaps just what this great city of Los Angeles, and the entertainment capitol of the world–needs; Art.

Art–The Universal Language

Art is after all, the great communicator. A universal language that began with the dawn of time and birth of humanity, art is divided by no race, creed, color or ethnic line. Whether rich or poor, an artist can grab some ink and paper, or forage for some canvas and paints, and in hope– release a part of their spirit in that art, for at least some of the world to glimpse and see.  Art can heal, or it can incite. It is the eternal voice of the artist that out-lives its’ creator.

The L.A. Art show, now in its stunning 22nd year, is with us again to welcome in an emotional 2017, when part of the nation is still in shock and mourning, and another part is in either secret or fearless public celebration of its new President.

Scott Diament and Kim Martindale Soar

Like this great city of Los Angeles itself, the L.A. Art Show is liberal, political, brave, and magnificent. The brainchild of Palm Beach Show Group President and CEO Scott Diament and Producer and Partner Kim Martindale, the rainy, gray skies of a winter Los Angeles literally parted this special day, and shone forth L.A’s famous sunshine, giving guests, patrons, participants, and the stars a reminder that yes–L.A. does have the best weather in the world, of any famous city.

Emma Roberts Shines Bright

Stars glided in this exiting night for the VIP Opening Night Gala, including the lovely and talented Emma Roberts, who hosted the Patron Level Opening Night Premiere Party Benefiting St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Emma Roberts proved to be a sweet, genuine actor, discussing her support for St. Jude, which pays the entire bill for special needs patients at this hospital who have what could be a life threatening illness.

Dancing Barefoot

Emma Roberts later walked quickly around the L.A. Art Show–after removing her heels to comfortably go barefoot in the sprawling Los Angeles Convention Center, and appeared to be purchasing at least one print of a famous master work.  Master Work prints, for those not in the business of art–can run between several thousand to around one hundred thousand dollars for a limited edition, which is well worth it for a master.

Up in Smoke

Host Committee members Natasha and Cheech Marin were back–Cheech Marin is that Cheech from the seventies iconic Cheech and Chong comic fame.

Like a Rolling Stone

Musical guests Whitney Myer Trio rocked the VIP stage with some songs including a commendable cover of the Rolling Stones.  Even more commendable, considering a female was doing Mick’s voice, making it all the more interesting.

Eat, Drink and be Merry

Endless gourmet food from Chef Jeffrey Nimer of Haute Chefs LA was offered, as was endless glasses of red and white wine and other beverages, at a myriad of open bars.  More endless food from a bevy of top local diners and restaurants served guests all from ice cream, chocolates, coffee, donuts, tacos, and more.  White table clothed tables filled up hundreds of VIP guests seated; enjoying dinner, deserts, and socializing with other patrons.

Art–A Man’s Name

The evening began with an exclusive collectors’ preview followed by the opening party, which also featured performance works by Carlos Martiel, Eugenia Vargas Pereira, Raphael Montañez Ortiz, Melanie Pullen, and Narcissister.

Back on the main floor, rows and rows of gallerists’ booths treated hundreds and later thousands of patrons and guests to fine art from some of the top galleries around the world.  Denis Block Gallery (Beverly Hills) is back, and shows a nice Lichtenstein litho, Eckert Fine Art (CT) is back with those fabulous parrots (Lories) by Hunt Slonem, artist Ryuma Imai (Japan) shows some very nice work including Giraffes and Bats at Yuji Fukuda, Robert Adelman (Oakland, CA) shows some nice Picasso ceramics, and Jerry Suqi is back from Chicago with some great Klimpt prints (collotype).

The Antique and Jewelry show with the LA Art Show, which was scaled back last year, is now gone, save for a select few booths. The classical side further too seems to be scaled back this year.

Naked as a Jaybird

Continuing the trend of last year which started showing live nudity with performance artists, this year has one or more partially body-painted, topless young women walking around in a near trance,  another group thong clad topless, body painted male and female artists doing dancerly moves and poses, and an African American performance artist Carlos Martiel lying totally naked on a few inch platform on the ground.  (Parents, keep this in mind when bringing children). Yes–art has nudity. Remember the Romans and Greeks from Art History?

Tony Song –the Selling Machine

Artist Tony Song (originally from China–now in L.A) is back, who had already sold a large painting when I spoke with him, and Angel Ricardo Rios is featured with a striking work called “The Garden of Excesses.”  MFA returns with their usual great prints of Master Works including Warhol, Picasso, and Chagall, as well as some nice Picasso ceramics.

There is much more to tell and see at this exciting show, which I will cover in the next installment of this review series. The L.A. Art Show runs daily through Saturday, January 14th from 11am to 7pm, and on its final day–Sunday, from 11am to 5pm.

General Admission Ticket Prices – per person (well worth it)

One Day Pass: $30 – Receive $5 discount if purchased online in advance

Four-Day Pass: $60 – Received $5 discount if purchased online in advance

Location: Los Angeles Convention Center: West Hall, at 1201 South Figueroa Street, Los Angeles, California, 90015.

Visit the official website at: www.LAARTSHOW.com

This content is copyright, 2017, Bruce Edwin, Hollywood Sentinel, all world rights reserved.

 

L.A. Art Show, 2016

By Moira Cue

The Artist-Friendly Gallery: A Short Interview with Gallerist Eric Nord of Leon Gallery at the L.A. Art Show

“We consider it a collaboration with the artist. The core group of artists we work with,” says Eric Nord, “are like family to us.” “One of the things we do is say, ‘Here’s our space, tell us the show you’ve always wanted to do. And let’s make it happen.”

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No wonder Leon Gallery, in Denver, Colorado is booked up two years in advance. Artist-friendly gallerist Eric Nord has a passion for the artists at Leon that goes above and beyond the average relationship of dealer to artist. The gallery gets involved in the long-term growth of its artists by doing things that other galleries don’t, like helping the artist find residencies or large scale public installations.

In the video below, Eric, who co-owns the gallery along with Eric Dallimore and Camille Shortridge, discusses the work of Diego Rodriguez-Warner, Matt Scobey, and Tim Schwartz with The Hollywood Sentinel.

This content is copyright, 2016, The Hollywood Sentinel, all world rights reserved.