Tag Archives: Oscar Winner

L.A. Art Show Soars With Anne Hathaway

Anne Hathaway LA Art Show with Scott

THE ACADEMY AND POLICH TALLIX FINE ART FOUNDRY
REVIVE THE ART OF OSCAR® STATUETTES

The Academy announced that Polich Tallix Fine Art Foundry, based in Rock Tavern, New York, will exclusively create its iconic Oscar® statuettes, starting with the 88th Academy Awards®. In a process that returns to the Oscar’s fine art roots, the statuettes will now be hand-cast in bronze before receiving its 24-karat gold finish.

“With the help of some 21st century technology, we’re able to honor the Oscar’s proud beginnings,” said Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs. “The new statuette exemplifies impeccable craftsmanship and the enduring nature of art.” Using a cast bronze Oscar from 1929, Polich Tallix artisans have restored subtle features of George Stanley’s original sculpture, which was based on sketches by MGM art director Cedric Gibbons. The overall size of the statuette remains the same.

ELITE AD 2016

“With this project, we’ve been entrusted with continuing a great tradition,” said Dick Polich, Polich Tallix founder and CEO. “It’s a privilege to be able to bring our art experience and technical expertise to the Oscar.” Polich Tallix started its Oscar-making process by creating digital scans of the 1929 statuette and a modern-era pedestal base. The digital Oscar was then 3D-printed and molded so the form could be cast in wax.

Each wax statuette is coated in a ceramic shell that is cured and fired at 1,600°F, melting the wax away and leaving an empty Oscar-shaped form. The statuettes are then cast in liquid bronze at more than 1,800°F, cooled, and sanded to a mirror polish finish. The figure portion of each Oscar is electroplated with a permanent layer of reflective 24-karat gold by Epner Technology, a renowned high-tech specification electroplating company in Brooklyn. The statuette’s bronze base receives a smooth black patina, which is hand-buffed to a satin finish. The time required to produce 50 statuettes in this manner is about three months.

At a height of 13.5 inches and weight of 8.5 pounds, the new Oscar retains the basic physical characteristics of its immediate predecessor, which had been made by Chicago-based R.S. Owens & Company since 1982. The Academy will continue its long relationship with R.S. Owens to service existing statuettes and create other awards for the Academy, including plaques for its annual Scientific and Technical Awards.

Polich Tallix, founded by Polich in 1972, combines advanced technology with world-class craftsmanship as it strives to create works of art that preserve each artist’s unique purpose and vision. The 88th Oscars® will be held on Sunday, February 28, at the Dolby Theatre® at Hollywood & Highland Center® in Hollywood, and will be televised live by the ABC Television Network at 7 p.m. ET/4 p.m. PT. The Oscar presentation also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

The L.A. Art Show (2016)

Review by Bruce Edwin

If you must skip church on Sunday (next year on January 15th 2017), don’t feel guilty, just go to the L.A. Art Show instead– it’s one of the best religious experiences you can have. Yes, great art to me can be like a religious experience. For it is artists that the great religions of the past adorned on their cathedrals. It is the artists that the Kings and Queens cherished, treating like royalty among their court. It is the great artist of today whose works sell for millions of dollars for one painting, and are clamored at by the rich and famous. Great art is not only an investment, and a treasure, it is a look inside the soul of its creator, and at its best, a glimpse to the divine of eternity itself.

And so, if you love art–and I can not imagine any one who does not, then you simply must attend the Los Angeles Art Show if you live in L.A. If you do not live here, when you do visit, definitely plan your trip around this show, as it is extraordinary. I spent at least 12 hours this year across numerous days visiting the show, and still probably missed some things.

Whether you are a dealer, collector, or simply a spectator, the L.A. Art Show is greatly entertaining, and a perfect way to take in thousands of great pictures from over 100 top art galleries from around the world.

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Hollywood Sentinel Art Writer Moira Cue walked out with at least one new purchase from the show this year, and I spoke with many gallerists and artists from the show this year who did exceptionally well, and were very happy with their sales, which was great to hear.

After navigating the parking, and long walk to finally get in to the show, one enters the glass doors of the massive North West wing of the Los Angeles Convention Center. The first thing one saw this year, past the red carpet, was a massive plushy Teddy Bear art piece, that looked like he was about 500 pounds overweight, with rolls of faux fur fat, that was a big hit.

unknown teddy

Near that, was a shiny bright red sucker by artist DOC that at least one Korean woman was having her picture taken near, pretending to lick the several foot tall piece.

The real estate brokerage company called THE AGENCY, that specializes in luxury properties and decor gave a free lecture, and had another very large VIP area that one evidently needed some type of credentials to get in to, where one could sit down on some sexy soft chairs by RAPPORT INTERATIONAL FURNITURE, and look at some fancy decor, including a very nice mirror with an image of David Bowie on it that I liked. The area, giving guests the very real L.A. experience of feeling like either a somebody, or a nobody. I sat down for a minute here, and quickly met a woman whose husband is a TV producer and writer. Small town.

REIKI WITH JACLYN- HOLLYWOOD SENTINEL

The Fine Art Dealers Association (FADA) was back.  One of the young women representing them this year was a tall, pretty Asian girl who; after I told her she looked like a model, admitted she was signed with a local agency.

The Media area was back, with ART SCENE kindly giving away its publication, as well as free sign up’s to their great e-mail list. Other free publications at hand included AMERICAN ART COLLECTION, BUSINESS JET TRAVELER, THE ARCHITECTS NEWSPAPER, GOOD MAGAZINE, SANTA FEAN, and the longstanding FABRIK and ARTILLERY. Another art mag was there I vaguely recall the name of, but a sign was present stating not to take it, which I was tempted to do anyway, but didn’t. Oh well. With no one even at that table, I’m sure they were selling a lot of that one. Other free publications included copies of ARTS & ANTIQUES, L.A. ART NEWS, and ANGELINO, with a great cover of the beautiful, and all grown up CHLOE GRACE MORETZ–wow.

While this years show was smaller than recent L.A. Art Shows of former years; most noticeably, ending the majority of the antiques and jewelry booths as well as ending most of the prints booths, this years show did get far more edgy, with numerous performance artists, which the show had not had much of before.  All of this years performance artists were female, most of whom decided to go topless–not that anyone seemed to be complaining.

While there were not many, there were some children at the L.A. Art Show, so it would probably be a good idea to let parents know beforehand that some of the performance art is PG rated. With that stated, I would applaud any parent that brings their children to such as great event as the L.A. Art Show, which is certainly more educational and healthy for any kid, than the latest twerk fest.

Performance artist MILLIE BROWN, positioned right near the left entrance and on the way to the classical side, spent her time lying down topless in her underwear on a wooden flower bed, surrounded by pretty flowers (that were supposed to be decaying). I don’t think anyone saw any flowers decaying, however they did see Millie’s bare chest, with large crowds regularly gathering around her, taking photos, and many men walking away either smiling or blushing. Millie was the artist who performed recently with Lady Gaga, throwing up day glo paint on stage. Yum–the art of sick. At least this time she didn’t do any of that.

MILLIE BROWN HOLLYWOOD SENTINELMELANIE PULLEN attracted large crowds with her performance art, titled “High Fashion Crime Scenes,” which is stated in her biography to be about stopping violence against women. At one time I saw the artist in a scene mock hanging herself from a tree, and in another scene, she was crawling on top of another women, with both in a short dress and heels, under rock concert like green and red lighting, eating the entrails of the woman below her, seeming to enjoy it all as the crowd stared in awe and taking photos. While I don’t know how many spectators thought of the actual historical crimes she depicted, and how violence against women should be stopped, they were all at least riveted to watching her, like a bloody accident one passed by and could not take their eyes off of. Some were compelled, others were simply grossed out, a few others turned away. Marilyn Manson would be proud of her organ eating work, which; beautifully lit and composed, was like a cross between a well made horror film shoot, and the theatrics of a satanic rock concert ending in a blood orgy to ‘The Cure,’ which she played.

AN UNKNOWN performance art installation occurred at or near the Chinese exhibition area, which entailed yet another young woman in her underwear and topless, standing in a small glass enclosed room, on view for the crowd to see that gathered to watch her. This performance consisted of her just standing there; texting on her cell phone, with two TV monitors outside of the glass box on the wall, which viewers could see. One monitor screen showed her standing there texting, and the other screen was a digital ‘read out’ of the texts she was typing, which were a bit frequent and long. This attractive young woman later was gone, and the next time I passed by, one caught sight of an elderly nude woman hunched over in a fetal position on her knees in the glass room. I have no idea who the artist or gallerist was, as I did not see any indication of that, so if someone knows, feel free to inform me and we will publish the updated information.

ACE GALLERY in Beverly Hills, as usual, had some outstanding work, and dominated a large area near the front of the show. ALEXANDER YULISH here, being my favorite at Ace.

The NATIONAL BASE FOR INTERNATIONAL CULTURAL TRADE (Shanghai), supported by the Bureau for External Cultural Relations Ministry of Culture, People’s Republic of China, brought us VISIONS OF CHINESE CONTEMPORARY ART, EMOTIONS AND SENTIMENTS, which was nearly as big as its name. This area consisted of many booths of Chinese based artists, with a few simply being American based artists, that were Chinese. I really enjoyed many of these artists work.

TONY SONG here, had some very nice works, and told me he was selling his works very well. JUSTIN Y. had some interesting works called ‘finger painting,’ which were very bright and colorful. Works here by SHEN XIANGYIN were very nice, as were the works of ink on rice paper by WANG FEI. SHEN CHUN XIA, who was kind, made some pretty works, including paintings of Chinese slippers which are very pop. She also designs Kimonos, which are very elegant.

Artist BOUN, also from China, was a nice man, and creates some very bright, colorful work using a method slightly similar to Warhol’s diamond dust technique, except mixing it undetectably in to the paint itself, and using various other gemstones, to add to the pigments’ hue.

LI XIA was a very nice artist, who made some great works, that I had the pleasure to interview, which will be running in a near future issue here. LI XIA graciously thanked me for my support, telling me that my praise of her work gave her new confidence that she had not had before. It must have, for she went on the next day to sell two works! Hey, where’s my commission? Just kidding. One of the titles of her works is called ‘Women General of yang Family,’ which is one of the ancient Chinese warrior tribes, in battle, led by a female warrior.

LIAHONA SPACE was a Chinese collective that also had some very nice works by Chinese artists. Artist LIU DADI was back, with some great black and white works. Last year, Dadi wowed the crowds with some outstanding color, nude works of the female form, which were very provocative. This year, he was back with some excellent, mixed media, black and white abstract works. Dadi expertly blends painting and photography, for some very unique and compelling pieces.

South Korean artist MARI KIM was heavily represented, with a booth of her work that she sat at, and also with her paintings over at the booth for SM Fine Art Gallery, which is located somewhere in Southern California, though I could not find their address on her biographical card. I did a brief interview with Mari, who looks like a young fashion model more than a successful, world wide artist, which she is. You’ll see what I mean in the next issue of The Hollywood Sentinel when we run that. Her work itself is quite exceptional, reflective a bit of legendary Japanese artist Takashi Murakami. Part pop, and part animie, Maori Kim even throws in some bright bursts of neon lighting in text bubbles with English language print to communicate directly with her audience, which she told me she likes to do.

LILIANA GOLUBINSKY made a great work titled ‘Walking on Water,’ at SASHAD EDPACIO De ARTE from Argentina. Walter, with WALTER WICKISER GALLERY in NYC was cordial to speak with, and has some great artists including by his father, RALPH WICKISER, and two other artists who I will be covering in great detail in a future issue here. including Finnish artist SOILE YLI MAYRY, whose colorful abstract work is exceptional.

Jane with ECKERT FINE ART in Pine Plains, NY was also very cordial to speak with, and represents an outstanding artist who she taught me, trained with Warhol in The Factory; HUNT SLONEM, who I will also be covering in greater detail in a future issue. Artist RYUMA IMAI had some nice work, from Tokyo.

REHS GALLERIES in NYC is one of my favorites, having some of the finest master works as well as contemporary art. With a contemporary booth and classical era booth this year, REHS has works by artist DAVID PALUMBO, who does some nice figurative work of the female form. While I did not see the following works here this year, their catalog also boasts a great work by CHRIS POUSETTE-DART, and the stunning work of ‘La Jeune Laitiere avec son Troupeau, by JULIEN DUPRE’, (1851-1910) which I have seen before in person a former year at the L.A. Art Show with REHS, and is of stunning quality. Similarly exciting in their catalog is GUY CARLERON WIGGINS, ‘The Library Winter,’ and JOHANN BERTHELSEN, ‘42nd Street & Vanderbilt Avenue, Grand Central Station,’ which I have also seen here in person, which for any New Yorker or one who has traveled to NYC and been at this location, makes it further special.

LAMA (Los Angeles Modern Auctions) within the show had some nice prints, original paintings, sculpture, and furniture. Here, TIM HAWKINSON has created a great, bizarre work called ‘Sweet Tweet,’ which I will cover later here with an image.

Artist JANA CRUDER displayed a cool sculpture she made called ‘Immortalization of Self,’ a figure of the Greek Goddess Venus, taking a selfie. I suggest that next time she displays it, it be put on a taller structure, rather than just sitting on the floor, and be properly lit, which is the artists’ or gallerists’ decision to do or not.

Artist MIKI YOKOYAMA made some pretty, ornate works on display. Another very popular artist was LLUIS BARBA’s work, at THE CYNTHIA CORBETTE GALLERY. Barba, born in Spain, reworks iconic artworks, introducing modern pop icons into the pieces, in a very unique manner, which the crowds loved. More nice work at Corbette included that by DEBORAH AZZOPARDI, which references LICHTENSTEIN in her press.

BRUCE LURIE GALLERY, in Culver City in Los Angeles, had some great works as always, and was very popular. Bruce Lurie told me that he gave BASQUIAT his first show in New York, and has been a major player in the art world for decades, both in NYC, Miami, and now L.A., with a focus on pop art and contemporary photography.

KAZUHIRO TSUJI, had a work stuck way in the back of the show, yet that dominated, with large crowds constantly gathered around it photographing it; a hyper-realist sculpture of the icon painter; FRIDA KHALO, truly an extraordinary work that I, like everyone, loved. Last year, Tsuji displayed his ANDY WARHOL sculpture here, which was equally great. The artist or gallerist however, was unfortunately, no where to be seen as far as I could tell.

SKIDMORE CONTEMPORARY from Santa Monica was back with BRIGHTON SMITH who does some nice pop work including ‘Rainbow Heels.’ SUSAN TELLER GALLERY in NYC showed some nice works by PEGGY BACON. Artist LORETTA TEARNEY WARNER created some very pretty works out of fabric, reflective of the Greek pre-classical era.

Another one of my favorites, and one of the best gallerists here; DAPHNE ALAZRAKI FINE ART from NYC was back, who also has an office in LaJolla, California. JEAN PIERRE CASSIGNUEL’s work here of ‘Les Tentes Bleues,’ being one of my favorites. Daphne is always cordial.

Another outstanding gallery, GEORGE STERN FINE ARTS, in Hollywood, California, showed another one of my favorites, ‘The Rose Arbor,’ by LAWTON PARKER (1868-1954) which is of great quality.

best in show--2016Lastly, my favorite art piece this year was at GUARISCO GALLERY, in Washington DC. With great works by masters including RENOIR, my favorites on display at this gallery this year were by JEAN-PIERRE CASSIGNEUL, known according to their catalog for his “depiction of ethereal, mysterious women.” I also loved the PISSARRO piece here, yet my favorite work in the entire show being the stunning piece here by ROUAULT, titled ‘Carlotta.’ A masterful portrait of a young female, the quality of this work is extraordinary, with its composition, layers of paint, and color, lending a myriad of dimensions of perception to its brilliance. A bargain at just under $300,000, that any one with over a million liquid would be silly not to buy.

ANNE HATHAWAY PHOTO BY BRUCE EDWIN

Last but not least, the most exciting part of the L.A. Art Show this year, was the Opening Night Premiere Party, otherwise known as the Patron’s Ball. At $250 per ticket, patrons were treated to the VIP area the night before the show was even open to the public. In the VIP area, guests enjoyed complimentary fine dining, drinks, wines, desserts, and a cool spoken word artist. VIP Patrons had the opportunity to purchase raffle tickets to win various exceptional prizes, with all proceeds going to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Hosts for the evenings festivities was none other than the legendary, beautiful, and talented singer, dancer, and Academy Award winning and Golden Globe winning actress; Anne Hathaway, and her charming husband, Adam Shulman.

I selected ANNE HATHAWAY as one of The  Hollywood Sentinel’s Top 10 Hottest Actresses of our time a number of years ago, referencing her mastery of her craft not merely as an actor, but like a star from the Golden Age of cinema; also as a dancer and singer. A truly legendary talent and beauty, it was to say the least, a great honor for me to meet one of my favorite actresses of our time.

Not to disappoint, Anne Hathaway was cordial, charming, lovely, and down to Earth, graciously shaking hands, posing for photos, and sitting down right along with the rest of the crowd. Her husband ADAM SHULMAN was a total gentleman; equally kind, gracious, and charming, and even smiling and telling me goodbye as I waved to him on my way out. What a great couple, and wonderful people!

Anne Hathaway seems to be simply an awesome human being. She took the stage before the hundred or so crowd of us, telling how for the past twelve years, she has donated her time visiting ST. JUDE CHILDREN’S RESEARCH HOSPITAL, which she told us, is the countries best, top quality hospital for children diagnosed with cancer. The other amazing thing about the hospital, founded by DANNY THOMAS, is that the treatment to all the children they care for, is totally free, supported by the hospital and the kind donations they receive, from people such as the VIP Patrons of the Arts at The L.A. Art Show, and wonderful celebrities including Anne Hathaway, as well as last years VIP Gala host for the L.A. Art Show, AMY ADAMS, among more.

A cancer survivor took the stage, introduced by Anne, and told of how St. Jude made him feel as safe and calm as possible, and gave him a new chance at life. During his story, the sweet Anne Hathaway got tears in her eyes, standing on stage behind the boy, now around 17. Some others in the crowd, including myself, got teary eyed as well, as he happily stated how he was now cancer free, and pursuing his dream of being an actor. As he described some of his recent acting successes with good nature, Anne smiled and laughed. It was a beautiful momentous filled night with one of Hollywood’s greatest stars, and all for a great purpose.

Anne Hathaway reminded us that she knew there were many other big things going on this night, including a big sports game. Yet, she said, she felt that this was the best place to be at this moment on Earth; seeing great art, enjoying great food and drink, seeing wonderful people, and supporting such a great and important cause as St. Jude. I couldn’t have agreed more; except I would add to that, also spending the evening with one of the most lovely, talented stars of all time–Anne Hathaway; thank you, for all you do, we love you.

And so with that, you really can’t get any bigger or better than the L.A. Art Show. Other stars were out in full force for the opening VIP night. HARRISON FORD was reportedly running around somewhere, probably buying some great art, and at least 30 or so other celebs were here. Thank you to KIM MARTINDALE (LA Art Show Producer / Partner), and to SCOTT DIAMENT (President and CEO) who I also had the great pleasure to meet. A very special thanks also to AGNES for the very kind support after all of these great years covering this amazing show. It was a whirlwind weekend and week as usual, and it all went too quick. I miss the show already!

PALM BEACH JEWELRY, ART & ANTIQUE SHOW will be held from February 10-16, 2016, and be sure to mark your calendar now, THE LOS ANGELES ART FINE ART SHOW and L.A. ART SHOW will be back January 11-15, 2017!

Further coverage on Anne Hathaway at the LA Art Show will appear in our next issue, as well as interviews with the artists noted herein, and more coverage of the show.

In additional art news, the show; ANDY WARHOL; LIFE AND LEGENDS is going on now which started January 16th, and goes until April 3rd, 2016, at the Pepperdine Museum in Malibu. Admission is free!

This content is copyright, 2016, Bruce Edwin / The Hollywood Sentinel, all world rights reserved.

How to Succeed As A Screenwriter

trumbo image

Trumbo

A blacklisted Hollywood screenwriter fights back after being jailed for his political beliefs in Trumbo, now on DVD and Digital HD, from Universal Pictures Home Entertainment. Inspired by the colorful life and legacy of the brilliant Oscar®-winning screenwriter Dalton Trumbo (Roman Holiday, Spartacus), Trumbo is an astonishing portrait of an often forgotten chapter of American history. A sharp and timely true Hollywood story, the riveting biographical drama is directed by Emmy Award® winner Jay Roach (HBO’s “Recount,” “Game Change”) and features Emmy and Tony®-winning actor Bryan Cranston.

In 1947, Dalton Trumbo (Bryan Cranston) was Hollywood’s top screenwriter until he and other artists were jailed and blacklisted for their political beliefs. Trumbo (directed by Jay Roach) recounts how Dalton used words and wit to win two Academy Awards and expose the absurdity and injustice of the blacklist, which entangled everyone from gossip columnist Hedda Hopper (Helen Mirren) to John Wayne, Kirk Douglas and Otto Preminger. The film also stars Diane Lane, John Goodman, Louis C.K., Elle Fanning, and Michael Stuhlbarg.

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Trumbo is a critically acclaimed film, nominated for an Academy Award® for Best Actor (Bryan Cranston), as well as two Golden Globes®, three SAG Awards, and three Critics Choice Awards.

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Star Wars

Star Wars: Episode VIII, began principal photography at Pinewood Studios in London on February 15, 2016. Star Wars: Episode VIII, which is written and directed by Rian Johnson and continues the storylines introduced in Star Wars: The Force Awakens, welcomes back cast members Mark Hamill, Carrie Fisher, Adam Driver, Daisy Ridley, John Boyega, Oscar Isaac, Lupita Nyong’o, Domhnall Gleeson, Anthony Daniels, Gwendoline Christie, and Andy Serkis. New cast members will include Academy Award® winner Benicio Del Toro, Academy Award® nominee Laura Dern, and talented newcomer Kelly Marie Tran.

FRANCESCA

Star Wars: Episode VIII is produced by Kathleen Kennedy and Ram Bergman and executive produced by J.J. Abrams, Jason McGatlin and Tom Karnowski. Joining the production crew will be some of the industry’s top talent, including Steve Yedlin (Director of Photography), Bob Ducsay (Editor), Rick Heinrichs (Production Designer), Peter Swords King (Hair and Make-Up Designer), and Mary Vernieu (US Casting Director). They will be joining returning crew members Pippa Anderson (Co-Producer, VP Post Production), Neal Scanlan (Creature & Droid FX Creative Supervisor), Michael Kaplan (Costume Designer), Jamie Wilkinson (Prop Master), Chris Corbould (SFX Supervisor), Rob Inch (Stunt Coordinator), Ben Morris (VFX Supervisor), and Nina Gold (UK Casting Director).

Star Wars: Episode VIII is scheduled for release December 15, 2017.

How to Succeed In Hollywood

Bruce Edwin is CEO of the A-list firm Starpower Management LLC, publisher of The Hollywood Sentinel, and also a film producer. His services, based on his years of expertise and success in the music and film industry are sought out and used by some of the most powerful companies and stars in entertainment. This ongoing article series, a precursor to his upcoming book, is his way of giving back to models, actors and bands, with free education- that in its totality and with its unabashed honesty- cannot not be found anywhere else. Free.

How to Succeed As A Screenwriter

1, Know your place and pay your dues by showing respect until you make it big. Until you are an Oscar nominated or Golden Globe nominated or winning screenwriter, realize that the production companies and producers, directors don’t need you, you need them. Don’t act like you are doing them a favor by sending your material or trying to get them to receive it.

2, Be prepared and follow directions given. When a producer or production company has agreed to look at your work, don’t argue or delay. Have ready exactly what they want, which may include a logline, a 1 page synopsis, a 10 page or more treatment, or the full script. Don’t ask them if you can send more than what they ask for, and definitely do not send something not asked for without the OK. This is a good way to get rejected before you even get your material read. Have everything ready right away, so that when they ask for it, you are prepared to send it and send it quickly. I had one screenwriter send me a full script, after I told him to only send me a one page synopsis. That is a quick way to get rejected. If one cannot follow directions on a simple document to send, one can not be expected to follow directions on a more serious and detailed matter like revising a script to someone’s specifications that is paying them. Follow directions.

3, Don’t ask questions before you are hired. After they are looking, or even before they agree to look, don’t ask them questions, which could waste their time and annoy them. A writer recently asked me– when I was going to read some of his work, what the difference was between an agent and a manager, in addition to about a half a dozen other questions, which I simply had no time for. Had he actually researched The Hollywood Sentinel ‘Archives,’ section, or even done a search to this answer online, he would have found the answer to this first question without attempting to waste our time. This is not a question to bother a producer, agent, or manager with. We don’t work on commission for no money down to educate people for free. Although I do educate people for free, when one is trying to get us to rep them, that is not the time to ask questions that one can easily find out on their own. Until you have a contract offer, don’t even hit people up with questions or you could kill the deal.

Can you imagine a guy meeting a girl, and wanting to ask her out, and then saying to her, so, “Will you make out with me a lot?” “Are you a good cook?” “Are you going to treat my children well?” No, she has not even said she will go out with him yet! Don’t do that! it’s too early.

So, when someone is looking or considering looking at your deal, it is not the time to ask them about their percentages, films funded, etc. If you don’t trust their expertise, don’t contact them to begin with, and when you do contact them, asking money questions prior to them even saying they are interested in not appropriate, unless again, you are already a top winning or top nominated screenwriter, in which case you will already have a top agent or top manager, which would mean you would not be asking the wrong questions, the agent or manager would be asking the questions for you, in the right manner.

4, When opportunity knocks, answer the freaken’ door and don’t send them running. One writer had a handful of scripts I was strongly considering representing. I sent him a short contract, and he told me that he needed over month to get back with me to ‘consider’ our deal. He claimed he needed several weeks for his attorney to look it over, and at least several weeks for him to film a webisode, which would include an extra week or so for camping. I told him that was fine, but that I would probably not be interested in giving him more than 10 business days, and that if he considered our business a priority, he could rush his attorney a bit, get a faster one, or cut his camping trip short, if he got no reception in the woods. He refused, and so I rescinded any and all future interest since he did not jump at the huge opportunity we were giving him. He was shocked, even though I gave him ample time to change his mind and move quicker. Over a year has passed, and no one has heard of this guy since, and my guess is, probably never will. When you have an A-list deal fall on your lap, do all you can to make it happen as fast as you can, and show them that you are eager, and appreciative. If you delay, you may delay your success for ever.

5, Thank the person! If you get an call or visit or e-mail from a top producer, agent, manager, or director, thank them for their time! My first test of whether or not I will deal with someone, is their manners or lack thereof. I have major investors– worth millions to sometimes even billions of dollars, that graciously thank me for my time, simply because they are classy ladies and gentleman, and are highly cordial and polite, when in fact, I should be the one thanking ‘them,’ and I always do. So when a writer hears from me, and does not thank me for my time, or show gratitude, I automatically lose all respect and interest.

6, Use the persons name, and address them as Mr. or Ms. unless they tell you to otherwise. Show respect. Just when I think I’ve seen it all, I often experience some other scenario that tops the rest in all manners of ridiculousness. As an example, another writer recently contacted me with no thank you, and actually instead of calling me by any part of my name, addressed me as the letter ‘B’! Not only is this lazy, it’s foolish. Pretend you are communicating with the person face to face. Show respect, and use their name.

7, Don’t give orders. If you are trying to get someone to do something for you, or to communicate with you, or return your communication, ask them, don’t order. Most rich or powerful people have worked very hard to get where they are at, and a part of that freedom they enjoy is not having to take orders from anyone. So, if someone gives them an order, especially when that person is trying to get a favor out of ‘them,’ they can generally forget a deal ever happening. Ask, don’t demand! And that’s an order! (LOL).

8, Answer your phone, and answer blocked calls. Any time someone that wants me to do something spends their time telling me about how they did not answer my call, because they don’t answer blocked calls, not only wastes my time, but sends me the signal that they are either A, control freaks, B, paranoid, or C, have bill collectors after them. I have told this story over and over, but unfortunately, it is one that needs repeating. Atlantic Records called me one time from New York, and the publicist there told me, “Bruce, record labels and film studios, we all call from private, blocked, or even dummy numbers. So if you want to be successful working in Hollywood in the music and film biz, answer private calls!”

I told this story about the blocked line and dummy number to an actress I represented once who was not answering our blocked line, and she asked me if I was calling her a dummy. I had to think about that one. I thanked this person at Atlantic Records for that advice, and always took it, and it was true. Every film studio lot I have had an office at, has phones that we had to use through the studio that had automatically programmed private or dummy numbers. The record labels are no different. This has been this way for ages, and is to protect producers and top level industry people from stalkers, and is also so we can better control our communication and ‘roll calls’ without interruptions we don’t want, controlling communication on our terms. So, answer your phone, and always answer private calls or numbers you don’t know and don’t complain about it. Complaining about this does not impress anyone, on the contrary, it will only show that you have no experience in dealing with the entertainment industry.

9, Don’t describe your film as a cross between one film and another, unless you are asked to compare it. One writer I know just emailed me a synopsis and described his film as when one title meets another certain film. The first film he mentioned I had never even seen, not liking the actor in the film, and the second film he compared his script to, I had seen, and after reading his script, found this comparison totally wrong, being nothing like the film mentioned. Further, why be ‘like’ another film anyway? Be original, and don’t compare your script to anything else unless you have to.

10, Don’t send producers you are working with or want to work with countless re-writes! One writer I am dealing with is constantly sending me revised versions of his script, which I simply have no time to read. Then, one funding source will have one version, and another funding source ends up with another version, then when we go back to discuss it, it has totally changed, and is a complete mess. This is a sign of an unprofessional screenwriter. turn in a final draft, and stick to it, unless you are asked to change it otherwise.

11, Proofread! I got another writer that sent me a script in with a ton of typographical errors. He had the audacity to tell me I could clean them up. No! That is not a producers job, it’s the screenwriters. Make sure that your script is perfect, and error free.

12, Don’t try to act like a producer on a film when you are not the producer, and are the screenwriter only. Your job is essential and important. I am not demeaning that job whatsoever. Just don’t try to overstep your boundary and act like a line producer or producer unless you actually are one, and have been retained by the owner or producer of the deal to work in this additional capacity.

I hope this has helped many of you. As always, if you have any questions, you are invited to contact me at the front page of this site.

The office of Bruce Edwin and Starpower Management accepts screenplays from Academy Award or Golden Globe winning or nominated screenwriters only.

This content is © 2016, The Hollywood Sentinel, Bruce Edwin, all rights reserved. Special thanks to Universal Studios and Skywalker Ranch.