Category Archives: How To Succeed In Hollywood

By Bruce Edwin

Film producer and screenwriter Bruce Edwin is CEO of the A-list firm Starpower Management LLC, publisher of The Hollywood Sentinel, and founder of Hollywood Sentinel Public Relations. His services, based on his years of expertise and success in the music and film industry are sought out and used by some of the most powerful companies and stars in entertainment. This ongoing article series, a precursor to his upcoming book, is his way of giving back to models, actors and bands, with free education– that in its totality and with its unabashed honesty, cannot not be found anywhere else, for free. This advice pertains to those in all areas of the arts; screenwriters, directors, actors, models, bands, dancers, and more.

Letters to the Editor:

Hello Mr. Edwin,

My name is A.C. I happened to stumble across your site while searching for agents and managers. I appreciate your straight forward and authentic approach. Being of like mind in that regard, my situation is as follows…

I’m an “aspiring” actor in my mid-thirties. I have few credits most of which are student films. I started in the industry in my early twenties and things progressed very quickly. I was connected with a manager who then connected me with a SAG franchised agent. I had gone on several auditions ranging from commercials, to leading roles in soaps and feature films. Literally within weeks of me taking my first acting class of many.

Needless to say I didn’t book very often, mostly modeling work. I was eventually dropped by my agent, soon followed by my manager due to lack of communication a immaturity on my part. I’ve been in and out of the industry over the years mostly out with the exception of this past year completing three shorts and a couple of minor auditions for pilots, which I got through a fitness client of mine who happens to be a television producer. I have maintained a commercial look and can probably play as young as 28 or 29.

My question to you, is with everything I’ve mentioned, in your opinion is there a manager and or agent who would be willing to take a chance on someone like me?

I will still pursue my renewed acting goals regardless of your response, but I would be greatly appreciative of any advice you would be willing to offer.

Thank you for your time.
Sincerely,

A.C.

P.S. I plan on implementing the Domino Technique in helping me achieve said goal, so I also thank you for sharing it.

(Note: The Domino Technique is a method of business applications developed by Bruce Edwin, as published in a former issue of The Hollywood Sentinel. The full name has been omitted by the editor out of respect for the actor).

Bruce Edwin Responds:

A.C,

I am glad you appreciate the writing and find some use with it, as well as implementing the Domino Technique. You are on the right path with that. Also, be sure to read all of the other articles of “How to Succeed In Hollywood” in our archives section which can be found at: www.TheHollywoodSentinel.com. You stated why you got dropped, due to immaturity and lack of communication. That’s good that you realize this, because the first step to overcoming any problem is realizing that you were the creator of the problem. Now, you did not indicate that you are no longer going to keep creating this problem by behaving in this way, so it is important to do that. My feeling is that if you did know that you were valuable and professional and doing all you needed to do, you would not ask if there would be an agent or manager willing to take a chance on you–rather you would ‘know’ it.

Not knowing something is obviously simply a lack of knowledge in that area. Certainly there are agents and managers out there willing to take a chance on you. But the question should be what type of agent or manager can you get, and what do you have to be, do, or have to get them? Can you get a low level agent or manager that does nothing for you, or a top quality one that helps takes you to the place you want to be? To get the best, you need to be the best, and to be the best in your career, you need to eliminate all areas in yourself concerning your career that are not the best. That includes firstly, your self esteem. You need to get your self esteem up, which is directly connected to your knowledge of success that will lead to success. If you lack self esteem, which many aspiring actors do, then you may need more training. And even the greatest actor can get more training. Just don’t get one of those acting coaches that wants to keep you under their wing training forever, and never let you go off and audition or work. If you were the best trained actor you possibly could be, I doubt that you would be asking me if an agent or manager would ‘take a chance’ on you. When one is highly competent, one knows the heights that they can achieve are limited only by their own reach. Get more competent as an actor with more training, and then you will have no doubts about getting the representation you want.

You may often hear agents and managers telling talent how there is no shortage of actors on town, ready to take there place. That is true for the mediocre or low level actors–the ones who cannot really ‘act.’ But there ‘is’ a shortage of ‘great’ actors in Hollywood. When you become great, due to a high level of competency in top level training, then your esteem goes up, because you know that you are now a product in higher demand.

Also, as I have stated in a former edition of “How to Succeed In Hollywood,” stop referring to yourself as an ‘aspiring’ actor. An aspiring actor means that you are working on becoming an actor. If you are an aspiring actor, then you are not an actor. To state that you are an ‘aspriring A-List actor’ might be more accurate, or in some cases, ‘aspiring’ to be an actor, but one is not an aspiring actor. Either one is an actor, or they are not. There is no in between. Imagine a man wanting to play baseball, telling everyone that he is an aspiring baseball player. What does that mean? He is either hoping to be a Major League all star player, or he is hoping to learn how to play baseball. If he is hoping to learn how to play, then he should stop hoping, and just go pick up a bat, ball, and glove and go learn how to play. Stop aspiring, and just act. If you are aspiring to a certain level, then make a written plan of how you are going to get there, with your top goal written at the top of the page, and working backwards to where you are now.

Its fine you are SAG-AFTRA, yet being SAG does not mean that one knows how to act. In fact, most SAG players don’t. Lack of credits does not matter so much as does lack of talent. One can have a hundred credits and still be a lousy actor. Which is funny to me when some SAG actors get offended when I ask them if they have training, when they automatically expect me to consider them valid as a talent just because they have union status or a few credits. That is not the case.

So, focus more on training, and less on credits. Focus more on your craft, and less on who will ‘take a chance on you.’ Focus on being the best, and the representation will–if you get out there enough, come to you if you become truly ‘great.’ Become a great actor, get in a play, record it, and then send that to a hundred agents and managers. Then you will have arrived much closer to the level you may seek. I hope this is further value to you.

– Bruce Edwin

Audrey Hepburn’s Roman Holiday Screen Tests

This content is ©2016, Bruce Edwin / The Hollywood Sentinel. All rights reserved. Audrey Hepburn’s Screen Tests, ©2016, AMPAS, all rights reserved.

Top 10 Greatest Filmmakers of All Time: Jean Luc Godard

Godard-Godet-Hollywood Sentinel

One of the most important filmmakers of all time, Jean Luc Godard has made over 40 feature films, in addition to numerous film shorts, written screenplays, produced, and published his own and others film criticism world wide. He has had a wider influence on audiences and filmmaking than most any other living filmmaker of our time, despite most audiences not even knowing it. The reason for his profound, and often unknown influence, is that he has remained deliberately obscure, independent, and unique, for over 50 years as a filmmaker, yet cinefiles such as known influential directors including Quentin Tarantino, Martin Scorsese, Robert Altman, and many more have studied his work, citing him as a major influence.

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One who knows Godard, could easily write a book on Godard, as many have done. I have seen only 30 of his motion pictures. Jean Luc Godard’s greatness is manifold. One of his most powerful contributions to cinema is his daring uses of sound as art, such as having sounds from former scenes cut and overlap into present scenes, having sounds blend together, or having sound disappear entirely for stronger cinematic effect. His infusion of politics and philosophy into cinema is also unique; often having characters discourse or debate politics or philosophy on screen, and at times even reading out of a book of poetry or philosophy right on camera, inter-weaving the message throughout the film. Godard’s reference to and use of fine art in his films are also unique, using artwork not only as a set design piece or a prop, but literally referencing painters within the duologue, or showing characters creating a painting, as they discuss the colors, hues, tones, or feelings that they evoke, blending this too within the film.

Godard’s occasional use of nudity is portrayed as a work of art itself, not gratuitous, but simply there, as a part of life as art for arts sake. Violence in his films are treated as a reality of life, but one that should be avoided yet not ignored. Beauty, art, life, philosophy, women, and love are revered in Godard’s work, while chaos, destruction, government, warfare, and politics are derided as evils to fight or shun. As a former film critic, films are referenced within many Godard films, either blatantly with a poster of a film on the wall or a mention of it, or as an homage to a scene re-created. Light and the camera lens are used artistically as a painting in a Godard film. He may have the cinematographer point the lens directly at the sky as some birds pass by, or simply gaze upon some clouds, trees, or rolling water. Godard puts the emphasis on the aesthetic beauty and power of the object in front of the camera, rather than subverting aesthetics to action or dialogue.

Katia Vaz-Hollywood Sentinel

Dialogue itself rolls out in a Godard film like a play, or often times like poetry, with stream of consciousness or nuanced fashion punctuated by a musical score or unique editing technique. Music in a Godard film often is classical; form Mozart to Beethoven or more, providing sweeping waves of emotion as a foreground or background to the scene or dialogue. Editing techniques by Godard are classic New Wave style, cutting long after the end of an action, a shot may linger on a subject no longer doing anything plot related, simply being or doing something ordinary, observing them as Andy Warhol may have done in one of his screen tests, simply letting the subject ‘be there’ and not imposing the time or space of a film on the subject with an ordinary edit. Godard popularized this technique, as well as the jump cut, cutting from one scene to an entirely different one, arguing that the viewer was smart enough to follow the change. This Godardian effect alone revolutionized cinema, with his landmark, groundbreaking debut feature film ‘Breathless,’ which also widely influenced the music video to come years later.

elite connections revised

Lastly, Godard revolutionized cinema further still by his use of camera technique. While Hollywood cinema follows a traditional ‘blocking’ technique of focusing on the primary character in either a long shot (LS), medium shot (MS), close up (CU), or extreme close up (ECU), normally at eye level and following the so called Golden Meane; at the upper middle left of the picture plane where the viewers eyesight allegedly first goes, Godard throws this out the window, and may mix up a variety of shots in blended, reverse, or broken sequence that deliberately shock the viewer, or may focus on a secondary character when the primary character is talking, or he may focus on another part of a persons body instead of their face when their mouth is moving, for example. In other words, Godard throws the so called rules of filmmaking away, often doing everything possible a different way, in order to shake up the medium, transgress the art, and enliven the viewer. Poetic, philosophical, and anarchistic with the creation of his motion pictures, Jean Luc Godard is, without debate, one of the most revered and important filmmakers of all time. The Hollywood Sentinel ranks him among the Top 10 Greatest Filmmakers of All Time.

Camellia Steele Final

Jean Luc Godard’s feature films include: 1960 Breathless, 1960 Le Petit soldat, 1961 A Woman Is a Woman, 1962 My Life to Live, 1963 Les Carabiniers, 1963 Contempt, 1964 Band of Outsiders, 1964 A Married Woman, 1964 Alphaville, 1965 Pierrot le fou, 1966 Masculin Féminin, 1966 Made in U.S.A., 1967 Two or Three Things I Know About Her, 1967 La Chinoise, 1967 Week End, 1968 Le Gai savoir, 1968 A Film Like the Others, 1968 One Plus One, 1969 Wind from the East, 1969 Struggles in Italy, 1971 Vladimir et Rosa, 1972 Tout va bien, 1974 Here and Elsewhere, 1975 Number Two, 1976 How’s It Going?, 1980 Every Man for Himself, 1982 Passion, 1983 First Name: Carmen, 1985 Hail Mary, 1985 Détective, 1987 King Lear, 1987 Keep Your Right Up, 1990 New Wave, 1991 Germany Year 90 Nine Zero, 1993 The Kids Play Russian, 1993 Oh Woe Is Me, 1994 JLG/JLG – Self-Portrait in December, 1996 For Ever Mozart, 2001 In Praise of Love, 2004 Notre musique, 2010 Film Socialisme, and 2014 Goodbye to Language, his first in 3D.

– Bruce Edwin

Goodbye to Language

Goodbye to Language is a deconstructed film. I have read the filmmaker’s comments about the plot (which were tweeted) and also some of the critical discussion, but I wanted to review the film before being contaminated by those influences in order to have a genuine experience and express it from a blank starting place, taking it on its own as best I could.

Goodbye to Language is the 21st century equivalent of what Guernica was to painting: a film created by a man who loves film so much he wants to destroy it. Vision competes with narrative. The luxury of seeing destroys meaning. It’s a 3-D movie made by an artist of the highest caliber; which is sort of like having a twinkie made by Gordon Ramsey. There was a particular moment of the interior of a room with a window overlooking a summer field that is one of the most singularly striking images I have ever seen in film and reminded me in its ethos of Marcel Duchamp’s enigmatic assemblage Étant donnés: 1. La chute d’eau, 2. Le gaz d’éclairage.

I concluded, sometime after the last credits had rolled, that this was the story of an adulterous couple and jealous murder told through the eyes of the couple’s adopted dog (the dog jumps into their car, they decide to keep him). The dog was played by Godard’s own dog. I believed the dog was the observer because of the non-chronology and the presentation of dialogue, as well as a reference to Jack London and Call of the Wild (which, coincidentally, I had just finished reading).

Godard’s own statements in this regard also include a subplot relating to a second couple, the relation of which to the main couple I don’t think anyone would have understood as fully as Godard’s description, but the film is so experimental that it doesn’t really matter what it is about, and each audience will make sense of it somewhat differently.

– Moira Cue

This content is ©2015, The Hollywood Sentinel.

How to Succeed In the Music Industry

swans

How to Succeed in Hollywood will resume in our next issue. The following list tells how to succeed in the music industry for bands, singers, and musicians, based on over two decades of professional experience working in the music industry, by Bruce Edwin, who has worked in publicity, A&R, tour management, tour booking, road management, band management, sound editing, concert and event production, and more. Bruce Edwin was the manager of David Williams, the guitarist of Michael Jackson, Madonna, Prince, and many others. Bruce Edwin is editor of subnormal magazine, the legendary indie, underground punk music and film magazine distributed world wide in the 90’s by Tower Records.

REIKI WITH JACLYN- HOLLYWOOD SENTINEL

How to Succeed In the Music Industry

1. Be willing to get an agent, manager, and record label or at least top distributor. If you expect to do it all yourself, you will never grow to the level of a star, because you will be too busy trying to learn a business you don’t know, instead of making music. I will cover how to get signed and how to get an agent or manager in a future issue.

2. Make videos. You should be making videos constantly, and giving away a portion of your music to promote to the fans, and selling the other 75 to 85 percent. Your videos can also be just you and the band hanging out, doing a rehearsal, or discussing life. The key is, you need to promote. Don’t worry about the image or sound quality of the videos at this point. Use your phone if have to and just record and upload, at least once a week if not daily.

3. You need to also promote online on other social media platforms. Try and get a big fan to do this job for you.

4. You need a street team promoter to hit the streets, clubs, stores and more with fliers about your new single or gig, with hard copy fliers.

5. Interact with your fans. Taylor Swift is a pro at this, which has made her fans completely obsessed with her. This is a good thing. You need (healthily) obsessed fans and in order to get that, you need to interact with them.

Katia Vaz-Hollywood Sentinel

6. Stop looking like a band. The band that looks like a band in 2015 is passe. Bands that don’t look like bands are more cool than bands that try to look like bands and copy every rock or pop cliche before them. I got an e-mail in this week from a publicist promoting a band whose lead singer has perfectly torn jeans and torn shirt, perfectly off of his shoulder, a can of soda in his hand, and a cigarette dangling from his mouth. Spare me. All that was missing was a bag of potato chips and video game joystick. In an oversaturated lightning fast culture that has seen much of it all, you need to do something different. And if one does not have enough creativity to do that, they should at least quit buying into the lame stereotypes of image and behaviour, and play against the stereotype.

7. Remember people that helped you along the way. If you fail to include people on your guest list that gave you a break, or fail to return emails of people that helped you at the beginning of your career, don’t be surprised if your career doesn’t continue rising as big as you want it to. I know many bands who made it big, but who ended up dissing their fans or the people who helped them along the way, thinking that it was all about them, when they found out the hard way that it was not all about them, it was about what value they brought to others. If you reject even a small group or even just one person who supported and helped you, don’t think that dissing just that one person can’t make a difference to your career. At the very least, if word of mouth spreading around or a powerful person doesn’t bring one back down to reality, one’s guilty conscious often punishes one’s self, and restores the karmic balance for them. I have seen this happen with the some of the most rich and famous people on the planet, and with smaller indie bands, that were on the top of their genre one year, and un-employed nobodies the next, because they were arrogant jerks that thought they could use everyone to get what they wanted, but never paid anything back and never showed any gratitude along the way.  Show gratitude, and never forget who helped make you have the opportunity of where you are. Even if you legally don’t owe them anything, have some respect for others.  If you don’t, you will surely one day find yourself poorly respected yourself, and not only back at the bottom of the hill, but prevented from even climbing back up it the next time.

elite connections revised

8. Think about what your songs communicate and what you communicate as an artist. You are an opinion leader. Do you really want your brothers, sisters, children, family, kids remembering you as the person that bragged about doing a lot of drugs, or who sang about getting high, puking in the toilet, or calling women debased names? If you don’t care today, will you care 10 years from today when your songs are still in the public? Think long term and broadly about the widespread effect your music has and will have on people. What do you want to add to the world? Is your music really benefiting people? If its your form of self therapy, will that outlet help or hinder others? Think about the big picture. Add goodness to the world. There is enough worthless, low value, trash music out there that should be forgotten and often is. Make a positive difference with what you communicate at all levels.

9. Avoid “pay for play” unless you can make a profit. Pay for play is when a venue says that will give you a gig if you sell enough tickets for them. This may seem unfair, that you are doing the venues job for them, but really its not. It is not the clubs job to give you a break or try help make you famous or known. That’s your job. Certainly, some clubs are successful enough that they already have a big enough built in crowd that they are always packed no matter who plays, and they can therefore take a chance on booking new talent. While the days of CBGB’s in NYC and The Gallery in Normal, Illinois are over, there are fortunately, still some clubs that still take chances on new bands. If you are offered bookings that don’t, where you have to pre-sell tickets to get the gig, and you are responsible for the money if you don’t sell the tickets, avoid that scenario unless you can really sell all of the tickets. If you can’t get the amount of tickets sold that a pay to play venue wants from you, then you have one or two problems. Either one, your music and band is not good enough to be marketable and create the demand to get enough fans, or two, you have not promoted yourselves enough, or don’t know how. If the music is lacking, then you need to fix that, fast, which only comes from more and more practice and training. If it is the marketing and promotion that is lacking, then you need to take responsibility for that yourself, or get someone qualified and experienced to help you. If you need help with this, call my office.

Richard Bernard Hollywood Sentinel 2014

10. Be willing to play for free. Be also willing to play for pay. I read a recent blog about how musicians shouldn’t be expected to play for free, because other professionals get paid so musicians should too. This is what we call in philosophy, the bandwagon technique, and does not always match reality. One needs food to survive, and will pay for it. One does not need music to survive (unless you are a fanatic like myself!) and so people pay in accordance to the value that they place on things. Bands that people love the most after that band getting more attention, have a higher value in the marketplace than a more unknown band that might be decent, but is not great. Furthermore, when one is in an area of the arts where the stakes are so high that one can become immensely rich or famous in that area if they excel greatly, then there is greater competition, and more people willing to make more sacrifices in order to make it big. Be willing to play for free—yes, but what I mean by this is, not to sell yourself short, but to love what you do so much that you would do it for free if you had to. Create your music for the love and passion of the music, not for the money. If you create from this passion, then the money will follow. And if you ever do play for free, be sure to stop half way through the set after a particularly great sounding song, and have someone on your team walk around the crowd with a can collecting money, letting the audience know that if what you do has value to them, if what you do is worth as much or even more than a bottle of beer or drink, than to give as much as they can and help you survive, because this is how you make your living or are at least trying to make your living. Don’t be afraid to ask for money on the spot from your audience. Communicate that need, and if you are good enough, and they like you enough, they will pay. You don’t have to wait for the venue or booker to pay you. Earn it from your fans on the spot, and, be sure to not sign any contract stating that you can’t make money from the audience or on your merchandise. So when I say be willing to play for free, be willing to, but also be willing to get paid. And if you are good enough, and ask with enough sincerity and directness, you will get paid.

For more information on the talent manager and to contact Bruce Edwin, visit:www.BruceEdwin.com.

Hollywood Hot Spot
Bar Sinister 2015

Bar Sinister is without a doubt, one of the best clubs in Los Angeles, where one isn’t subjected to dreadful Top 40, and throngs of jacked up jocks in blue jeans and sneakers. No, Bar Sinister is the place where those types not only would be out of place, they don’t even get through the door typically, with a dress code here that is strictly enforced. Fans of Marilyn Manson, Bauhuas, Siouxsie and the Banshees, Death in June, Nine Inch Nails, Rammstein, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and the Misfits find this hallowed ground home, and for good reason. Bar Sinister isn’t just about the music, or the look, but like the so called Gothic/Industrial scene itself. It is a lifestyle and state of mind. With one large indoor dance room, sexy go-go girls on dance blocks bumping the night away, and an outdoor dance floor and concert area with a stage for bands, Bar Sinister is one of the best parties in town, again and again. Sexy DJ Amanda Jones reigns the room with pulsing beats of punk, gothic, industrial, acid house, and more; while a recent night Saturday had more dance than anything dark or industrial, it was still fun, and unlike some DJ’s, Amanda knows how to read the rythem of the crowd and keep things jamming. Upstairs is the staple dungeon, where attractive young women and men perform their 50 Shades of Gray scenarios in front of a gazing audience dressed in leather, lace, latex and PVC. The crowd at Bar Sinister, aside from the music and moonlit atmosphere, is the best reason to go. The crowd here ranges from club kids to the weekend revelers, and satisfyingly, they look mostly beautiful. Like this chick in one punk documentary on the 70’s punk scene I once saw stated, “Their look, their outfits, their hair, their make up, is an extension of themselves. They look so sculpted and beautiful.” Indeed. It’s places like Bar Sinister that the fashion industry and filmmakers often use as influence for the next new creation, inspired by such a lovely audience. On this night, I happened to help break up a fight before the bouncer got close enough to throw some jerk out. Energies do run high in clubs in Hollywood, so, bring in some good energy, dress to impress, and be cool. You know we will.

Bar Sinister: 1652 N Cherokee Ave, Los Angeles, CA 90028 10pm – 3am, Saturday nights.  – subnormal magazine

Calendar

March

14. Blue Oyster Cult, Saban Theatre
21. David Cassidy, Saban Theatre
Make Peace Day, Peace Museum launch and
peace rally, at 5464 Wilshire Blvd.
24. Gang of Four, Public Access TV, El Rey
Tings Tings, Fonda

April

11. TV Land Awards, Saban Theatre
14. Swans with Angel Olsen, El Rey
17. Pat Benetar and Neil Giraldo, Saban Theatre
30. Artopia, art and music fest, Container Yard, DTLA

May

1. They Might Be Giants, The Regent, DTLA

SWANS

Michael Gira / Swans / Angels of Light: Michael Gira founded the seminal NYC band Swans in 1982. Quickly infamous for their punishing, brutal and repetitive onslaughts of sound, extreme volume levels, and the self-abusing, abject shouts and growls of Gira’s sloganeering vocals, Swans gradually transformed over 15 years, ultimately venturing into harsh mechanical proto-industrial rock, to sprawling shifts of texture and perspective (see the bucolic atmospheric folk idles and martial stomps of their much heralded Children of God double LP from 1987), to gentle acoustic-based songs, and finally on to their ultimate statement, Soundtracks For The Blind (1997) which somehow incorporated all of these elements at once, across well over 2 hours of music in one album. At this point, Gira called it quits after 15 years of relentless touring and productivity, and disbanded Swans.

Since 1999 Gira has released his music under the name Angels Of Light. He writes the songs for Angels Of Light on acoustic guitar and orchestrates them using a shifting cadre of musicians, employing a wide variety of instrumentation such as strings, wind, brass, electric guitars, electronics and choral vocals. The songs are often eccentric and extreme, in keeping with Gira’s love of soundtrack music. Though nominally more traditional than Swans, Angels Of Light is often just as hard hitting through different means. The most recent album by Angels Of Light is We Are Him. When not recording, writing music, or touring, Gira spends his time producing and releasing music through his label Young God Records. He’s been responsible for such notable talents as Devendra Banhart, Lisa Germano, Akron/Family, Larkin Grimm, and James Blackshaw. Recently, Gira decided to Re-activate Swans. Here’s what he has to say about that decision at the YGR website:

“About reconstituting Swans: … there was a point a few years ago during a particular show when I was on tour with Angels Of Light, with Akron/Family serving as the backing band. It was during the song The Provider. Seth’s guitar was sustaining one open chord (very loudly), rising to a peak, then crashing down again in a rhythm that could have been the equivalent of a deep and soulful act of copulation. The whole band swayed with this arc. Really was like riding waves of sound. I thought right then, “You know, Michael, Swans wasn’t so bad after all…” . Ha ha! It brought back – in a flood – memories, or maybe not memories, more a tangible re-emersion in the sensation of Swans music rushing through my body in waves, lifting me up towards what, I can only assume, will be my only experience of heaven. It’s difficult – and probably pointless – to try to describe this experience. It’s ecstatic, I suppose – a force of simultaneous self negation and rebirth. Really, I probably only experienced this a handful of times to such an extreme extent during the entire 15 year history of Swans. All the elements have to align perfectly, and you can’t force it, though you might constantly strive for it. I don’t mean to be too lofty here, but it’s a fact. I’m talking about my own experience of the music (though I’d hope people in the audiences along the way might have experienced a similar episode).

When I ask myself if I believe in God, I start to say NO, but then I remember that sensation, and I’m not so sure. So I want more of that, before my body breaks down to such an extent that it won’t be possible any more. So I’m doing it. Naturally, some of the material for this new record will be songs, centered around the voice and words. Other parts (I’m hoping) will be reaching for what I’ve described above. One thing I want to point out right now: THIS IS NOT A REUNION. It’s not some dumb nostalgia act. It is not repeating the past. After 5 Angels Of Light albums, I needed a way to move FORWARD, in a new direction, and it just so happens that revivifying the idea of Swans is allowing me to do that. I’ll be using what I learned in the last several years to inform the way this new material develops, while carrying forward from where Swans left off with its final album Soundtracks For The Blind, and in particular, Swans Are Dead. If you have expectations about how Swans should be, that’s your business, but it would be a disservice to both of us if I were to make music with your needs in mind, and the music would certainly suffer as a result. In any event, I certainly never thought this day would arrive, but it’s inevitable, it’s here, it’s fate, so I’m succumbing to it.

Helping me in this quest are the fantastic musicians and friends listed below. I’ll enter the studio with the songs, we’ll hash them out together, someone will come up with something unexpected, then that will lead to new ideas, the song will take a different trajectory and the material will grow on its own. This is what I’m hoping, anyway. Here’s the main musicians (though probably a lot of guests on the recording). These are the people best suited – in terms of my relationship with them and their particular musical attributes – to help move the music forward: Michael Gira / guitar / voice / mendicant friar act; (original swans) ; Norman Westberg – guitar; (original swans) ; Christoph Hahn – guitar; (mid period swans and most angels); Phil Puleo – drums, percussion, dulcimer etc etc (final swans tour and most angels); Chris Pravdica – bass and gadgets (flux information sciences / services/ gunga din); Thor Harris – drums, percussion, vibes, dulcimer, curios, keys, etc etc… (angels, now also with Shearwater) … at the time of this writing the album is still in progress. Additional guests so far include Devendra Banhart; Bill Rieflin (drummer for REM) and Grasshopper of Mercury Rev… ”  (Content extracted from the El Rey Website, and also ©2015, M. Gira.)

Season of Ghosts just released a new single that has a massive sound and energy, here below:

©2015, The Hollywood Sentinel