Nickelodeon in the News

According the The Hollywood Reporter, “The U.K. Government will allow a number of film and television productions to be exempt from following quarantine rules and resume filming safely this summer” cites Casting Networks.

Nickelodeon Reports: 

Nickelodeon bakes up a birthday surprise with Cake My Day, a one-of-a-kind special executive produced by television host Rachael Ray and culinary expert Amirah Kassem.  Hosted by Kassem, founder of Flour Shop in New York and creator of the sprinkle-filled Rainbow Explosion Cake, the special gives a deserving kid the opportunity to bake the cake of their dreams.  Cake My Day airs Friday, July 17, at 7:30 p.m. (ET/PT) on Nickelodeon.

Said Ray, “With my favorite unicorn Amirah Kassem spreading her signature sprinkles and smiles, Cake My Day is a delicious celebration that I can’t wait to share with families everywhere.  This is a show guaranteed to fill your day with color and cake!  And will leave you racing into the kitchen to use Amirah’s tips and tricks to whip up some crazy creations of your own.”

Said Kassem, “I’m so, so excited to show the world how we can all use birthdays to create more joy for everyone around us. Cake My Day was born out of a way of life I like to call the ‘Birthday Lifestyle,’ where we live everyday like it’s our birthday by being with our favorite people, dressing in our favorite clothes, and of course, eating our favorite foods!  It’s more important than ever to remember that we can all create happiness through celebration, and no matter what is happening in the world, we need to celebrate one another.  Full of surprises, my hope is that Cake My Day will inspire kids, and adults, to live the birthday lifestyle and celebrate their family and friends.  We need to keep spreading magic, rainbows, glitter, unicorns and eating cake!”

In Cake My Day, Kassem invites Charlotte, a triplet who has never had a birthday that felt like her own, to her colorful kitchen to bake a Rainbow Explosion Cake together.  Charlotte, however, has no idea that her brothers Oliver and Sam have secretly planned for the day of cakemaking to turn into the biggest surprise birthday celebration she has ever had.  The special also features an appearance by DIY content creator Karina Garcia and a performance by dance superstars The Lab.

Cake My Day is produced by Propagate, with Ben Silverman, Howard T. Owens and Kevin Healey executive producing, and Watch Entertainment, with Rachael Ray and Jonny Umansky serving as executive producers. Amirah Kassem also executive produces, along with Nickelodeon’s Unscripted Content executives Rob Bagshaw, Mandel Ilagan and Stacey Carr.  Production of Cake My Day for Nickelodeon is overseen by Rob Bagshaw, Executive Vice President, Unscripted Content.

About Propagate

Founded by Ben Silverman and Howard Owens, who pioneered the global format business in the late 1990s, Propagate has offices in Los Angeles, New York and Paris. Its recent credits include the “Hillary” documentary that premiered at Sundance and Berlin and now streams on Hulu as well as the unscripted “November 13: Attack on Paris” “Haunted” and “Prank Encounters” for Netflix, “In Search Of” and “Kings of Pain” for the History Channel and the upcoming Notre Dame Documentary for ABC, and the scripted “Blood and Treasure” and “Broke” for CBS, “Charmed” for The CW and “Emma” and “Wireless” for Quibi.  Propagate’s expanding portfolio of companies includes Electus (“You vs. Wild”, “Running Wild With Bear Grylls,” “Jane the Virgin,” “Fashion Star”), Big Breakfast (“Adam Ruins Everything”, “Hot Date”), Notional (“Chopped” franchise), and talent management firms Artists First, Authentic Talent & Literary Management and Select Management. Silverman and Owens previously founded Reveille, producing hits including “The Office,” “The Tudors,” “Ugly Betty” and “MasterChef.” Silverman went on to serve as Co-Chairman of NBC Network and Studio and form Electus. Owens served as President of National Geographic Channels Worldwide.

It’s Pony 

Nickelodeon announced this month that  it has greenlit a 20-episode second season of its new hit animated series, It’s Pony, which follows the comedic adventures of Annie and her best friend, who just so happens to be an enthusiastic, impulsive, and carefree pony. Season two will premiere domestically in 2021, followed by a rollout across Nickelodeon’s international markets.

It’s Pony is currently one of the top three animated series with Kids 2-11 across all TV, only behind Nickelodeon’s SpongeBob SquarePants and The Loud House. The premiere of It’s Pony (1/18/20) was Nickelodeon’s highest-rated animation launch with Kids 2-11 since 2018.

“The overwhelming reaction to the first season of It’s Pony has been phenomenal, and fans have been champing at the bit for a second season,” said Nina Hahn, Senior Vice President of Development and Production, Nickelodeon. “We are thrilled to greenlight season two of a show where no matter what happens, everything is better when Annie and Pony are together.”

In season two of It’s Pony, Annie and her ever-loving, ever-funny Pony take their city by storm. Whether they are crashing a comic convention or battling a swarm of revenge-seeking flies, Annie and Pony’s adventures test the limits of their friendship like never before. Pony’s unpredictability may be a lot to handle, but Annie wouldn’t have it any other way. Throughout everyday life and extraordinary shenanigans, Annie’s life is better with Pony around.

The series stars Jessica DiCicco (Adventure Time) as Annie, an optimistic and determined farm girl living in the city with her family and best friend Pony; Josh Zuckerman (Strange Angel) as Pony, who is naïve and impulsive, but loves Annie more than anything; Abe Benrubi (E.R.) as Dad, who treats Pony as a nuisance, but recognizes the special bond he shares with Annie; and India de Beaufort (All Hail King Julien) as Mom, who loves Annie and Pony’s relationship and always has a new prank in the works. Created by Ant Blades, It’s Pony is inspired by a short from Nickelodeon’s 2015 International Animated Shorts Program.

About Nickelodeon

Nickelodeon, now in its 41st year, is the number-one entertainment brand for kids. It has built a diverse, global business by putting kids first in everything it does. The brand includes television programming and production in the United States and around the world, plus consumer products, digital, location based experiences, publishing and feature films.  Nickelodeon and all related titles, characters and logos are trademarks of ViacomCBS Inc. (Nasdaq: VIACA, VIAC).

Card Sharks, ABC’s reboot of the classic game show, is the latest broadcast network series to head back into production, according to Casting Networks.

From the Streets of L.A.

By Moira Cue

Moira Cue is an award winning fine artist, singer / songwriter, and actress. Her artwork is in collections world wide, and she has appeared on stages including The Mint, The Viper Room, Heaven Gallery, and The Key Club among more. 

Yesterday, after months in isolation, I drove to downtown LA for the first time. It was not the same place I lived for nine years. The first sign was a military Humvee full of national guardsmen parked on the side of the 110 freeway, something I had never seen before. I drove to a parking lot, hoping to charge my electrical vehicle and validate at Target. There was a big sign in front, saying Target was closed until further notice. I remember Target when it was Macy’s and I remember the B.R. period; Before Ralph’s (much less Whole Foods). When downtown was a ghost town after five pm, before most of the luxury lofts sprang up. Before it was cool to live there.

Maybe there is nothing whiter than quoting REM. But “Everybody hurts, sometimes.” And lately, it seems to me, that “sometimes” happens to be now for a whole lot more people than what we are used to in America. The “shining city on a hill” has given way to “American carnage.”

Speaking of 1992, it was not just the year of REM. It was the year the Rodney King beating was caught on video tape, followed by riots in Los Angeles County that left 63 dead and more than 2000 people injured. After receiving a more than three-million-dollar civil judgment against the LAPD, Rodney King died in 2012, at the age of 47, in an accidental drowning in his swimming pool, fueled by a combination of drugs and alcohol in his system.

He is most widely known for saying, “Can’t we just get along?” but what he actually said was slightly more verbose: “People, I just want to say, you know, can we all get along? Can we get along?”

It has been eighteen years since the Rodney King beating, eight years after King’s death (the same year George Zimmerman murdered Treyvon Martin), and five years after the unrest in Baltimore following Freddie Gray’s death in police custody. And now the death of George Floyd, which we all know about, seems to have been a spark in the tinderbox. It is not just Minneapolis, Atlanta, New York, and Santa Monica on fire. For me, it feels like my brain is burning.

“…Can we get along?”

 We are in the middle of a pandemic, many more millions of people are unemployed than have been since the Great Depression, and racial inequality is suddenly front and center in the news in a dramatic way. So why not, I thought, see for myself what I have only seen in the papers?

I drove down 7th, seeing exponentially more boarded up stores than had been present prior to the area’s revitalization. I started driving circles around blocks, surveying the collateral damage. Spray paint. Smashed windows. Dozens of clusters of men in camo with automatic rifles, like some occupied third world country.

In the middle of Grand, not the curb, a group of affluent African-Americans sat inside a parked Mercedes that looked like it cost at least six figures. They were completely decked out in sporty designer everything, notably the richest-looking people I saw all day. Because the normal lunch work crowd of well-heeled corporate types was missing. They had not come back from the pandemic; they have been laid off or are working from home. And loft-dwelling women with young children, who might normally be running errands during the day, were nowhere to be seen.

The homeless, the agitated, the police and military, a few young, intrepid trendy types, and the working poor made up the majority of those walking around on foot. Driving around a corner, I saw a volunteer crew with gloves, rags, and cleaning supplies, working to repair the damage that had been done after several nights of looting and rioting. I decided it would make me happy to join in and continued to look for a place to park nearby. I wound up near 7th and Main, an edgier side of the city. A barefoot man in jeans and a T-shirt lounged, sitting on the dirty sidewalk outside a fried chicken shack, arguing to the air about the many wrongs he had endured. Some of the Mexican restaurants with juice bars and pizza places were open, some knock-off sneakers were being sold, and many stores simply had boarded windows.

I had to walk a few blocks back to the work crew, passing a group of LAPD without protective face masks on the corner. I greeted them with a smile, asked how they were doing, and thanked them for their service. They seemed genuinely happy for my appreciation. I also passed a young, rocker type young man with a cell phone who was taping the National Guard and taunting them. They ignored him.

By the time I got to the volunteers, half had stopped working and half were removing graffiti from a Komatsu crawler crane. I asked if I could lend a hand and was immediately greeted with a friendly welcome chorus. (The group was organized by LA Works.) Several women introduced themselves and then I decided to ask questions. A young lady named Amy answered most of them. Amy, though white, was a dedicated Black Lives Matter activist. Not only had she been out protesting night after night, but she and other protesters had been working since 7:00 in the morning to clean up after people she described as “anarchists” had used the protests as an opportunity to create mayhem. “That’s not what Black Lives Matter is about,” she said.

Amy was wearing a face mask, but not every organizer was. When I caught up with a young man named Reeyan, who declined to be interviewed on camera, he was walking with a crowd of just less than a dozen people shoulder-to-shoulder, with his surgical mask under his chin. “Do you mind if I ask you, do you have any health concerns? About spreading COVID?” Reeyan stated that he had a background in emergency management, but his primary health concern was whether the homeless would get access to medical care, not COVID-19. When pressed, he concluded that the increased availability of coronavirus testing made getting sick a non-issue for him personally. (In fact, despite the gradual reopening of LA County, new coronavirus cases have continued to climb upward since March, and as of June 4, 2020, there have been about 2500 deaths—more than half of just under 4500 deaths statewide. The New York Times estimates that at least 57,000 people have had the virus in LA County.) When my conversation with Reeyan was interrupted to let us know we were going back to base camp rather than another cleaning site, I turned in my unused supplies and started walking the other direction, hoping to get to talk to a few more Los Angelenos about the strange times we are living though.

A group of four national guardsmen, all weighed down in heavy tactical gear, looked like they could use a little friendly conversation. But when I introduced myself as a blogger, the biggest and most intimidating of them, wearing reflective glasses, stepped forward in a defensive stance, and they whispered among themselves only to offer to refer me to the office in charge of PR. “Oh, well,” I said, “How about I just ask you one human being to another, how are you doing? What is it like to be down here? Off the record.” At that point, even the tall muscular guy who was a little older and more seasoned than the others smiled and relaxed. The one with the baby face, who had been most eager to talk, opened up and the others chimed in with their comments and impressions. Since it was off the record, I do not want to break their trust or get anybody in trouble. But as I fell asleep later that night listening to a YouTube video on “sense-making,” I reflected on Daniel Schmachtenberger’s distinction between truth and truthfulness. He talked about our social media and cultural information siloes and increasing ability to filter out any information that detracts from what we already believe.

In other words, between Amy and the LA Works group of volunteers, and the young men on active duty called in from other parts of California to keep the peace, there was no difference in truthfulness: each came from a desire to serve, and both expressed their beliefs about why they were there with complete sincerity. I could describe both groups as idealistic, values-driven, and concerned about being misperceived, misportrayed (even in a small independent blog) or misunderstood.

All four active duty service members were without any type of face mask and none made any effort to keep back. So, when I saw another guardsman with an army-issued green cloth face covering (in 90-degree heat) I stopped to ask him why he was wearing one when so many other people were not.  He admitted they “weren’t supposed to express any personal opinions” as if he was feeling out whether or not I was asking anything dangerous when I asked if they had been issued protective gear like N95 masks and what the leadership was doing to protect them from COVID. He said he felt bad wearing the mask because people couldn’t see him smile and didn’t know how friendly he was with it on, and that he and his squadmate, who got out of the Humvee to join in the conversation, were “a little more careful” than some of the other guys, perhaps because his wife was a nurse. At one point he revealed that he just figured he would get it and there was nothing he could do. “People have spit in my face. I have been around so many people. I keep getting tested and I do everything I can but eventually it’s just going to happen,” he said, with a mix of resignation and anxiety. “Oh, you’ll be fine,” I reassured him. “I got sick in March. Most of us will be fine.” As we talked, he seemed to come to a resolution, “I’ll talk to somebody. I’ll tell somebody,” he said.

When you live or work downtown for any period of time you learn there are people you do not talk to. There are people with very obvious schizophrenia and people who are in the active throws of a psychotic episode. You see this every day. There were two women who were lucid enough to know that there is a great deal of race-pain and race-rage active this week but otherwise struggling to “sense make.” One warned me not to get close to her; the other waved a wooden crucifix at another group of guards, practicing some sort of impromptu exorcism while hurling epithets. They remained impassive.

Since the cause of the protests rocking our country is police brutality against African-American men, and aside from one LAPD officer everyone else I’d conversed with was from other races, I wanted to make sure to connect with other Black voices downtown who had witnessed the situation locally. Three different security guards were the friendliest faces to fit that bill. The first, Kevin, asked me how I was doing, and I said I was having some feelings, then I asked him how he was doing. Kevin, it turns out, had applied for unemployment months ago but not gotten anything yet. He was a baker, but no one was taking his pies, and the looting provided him with his first job in weeks—but he really lit up talking about Normandie’s. And asked me to follow him on Instagram. So, if you want to support a small, local, Black business, please follow Kevin at @kevin202014 (security/chef/artist). Maybe you can order some pie.

The other two guys did not look like security guards (Kevin had a uniform, these two were dressed in street clothes) but were just as friendly. I told them I used to live downtown but hadn’t been there in a while, and they hadn’t been there in a while either, until they got called to guard one of the stores that had been hit. We all felt a little shock and sadness. “There’s so much going on right now, and I just feel for … everybody,” I said. “That’s very well put,” one of the men said. “How are you feeling?” I asked. “HOT!” they said. “Yeah, I’m dripping sweat,” I admitted, walking back to the car.

When you have been socially isolated for so long, and you go out to a population dense area, all those people are so much more memorable: The Latin American immigrant woman sweeping up a glass storefront shattered to pieces the size of marbles, who I told I was so sorry she had to clean this up. The thin dark skinned man with blue eyes and dreadlocks at Whole Foods, who was talking to someone else and all I heard was the phrase “Black people…” but the gist of it was something about accomplishing peace through consciousness, and his very presence spoke of both peace and consciousness. The rows and rows of squadrons moving in and moving out in a trail of Humvees outside the LAPD headquarters, the presence of military efficiency—for peace or law and order. The rows of tents filled with mostly men of all races, many tan white and Latino, some with tattoos, some in various states of half-nakedness, all living in dire poverty, and mostly, as Reeyan pointed out, without access to medical care except for emergency technicians who themselves are still at heightened risk. And as I drove through the gates of Chinatown, I glimpsed, in the grass, face-down, sobbing and heaving, a Black man in a white polo shirt and the throws of utter despair. I wondered if he were sick, or if I could help, but I was already on my way to the freeway and knew from experience that stopping rarely improves anything. Sometimes you can offer water or a few kind words. There is not much you can do.

Everybody hurts, sometimes. But some people hurt all the time. And while “we” think about Black people this week, and Black people tell us they think about racism every day of every week and they’re tired, really the only thing you can tell about someone by the color of their skin is the color of their skin. All you can tell by the clothes they wear (including a uniform) is what clothes they are wearing. So even if it is something small, like a smile, or asking if someone is ok, let us try do that. Let us try a little extra kindness. Please. Sometimes pain is obvious, the man sobbing in the grass; but sometimes it is not. You cannot tell. You don’t know. Just assume that everybody needs a little extra love. And be safe, and pray for peace, because your life is worth it.

(subnormal magazine states:  The person interviewed in this story provided no proof that anarchists were causing chaos, which has in many cases, found to be caused by members of certain “political” groups. Not all anarchists  support violence, chaos, or the destruction of property).  

 

 

End the Tyranny–Music Is Essential!

Would you have told The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, or Janis Joplin that they are  non-essential workers?  Musicians ARE essential, and so are concerts.  Certain tones of music has been scientifically proven to heal. Music travels on sound waves which enter the body and effect the nervous system, heart, mind, and soul. To most anyone with open ears and an open heart, great music lifts up their spirit and can give one happiness and hope for a better tomorrow.

Children and teenagers are particularly impacted powerfully by music, which can help lift them out of depression, feelings of isolation, and despair. Music is scientifically proven to be therapeutically healing. The branch of music therapy exists for this fact alone.

Human beings are social creatures. The communal aspect of seeing and enjoying great music with others is a healing, spiritual moment for many. Indeed, live concert performances by performing artists should be deemed as essential as a public church service.

The move by certain city, county, state and federal authorities to deny the rights of adults and young people the right to see concerts, and to deny the rights of the artist the very purpose they were put forth on this earth to do–to make a living performing–is a criminal act. It is appalling, and it is unconstitutional.

American citizens did not vote for an adult baby sitter. We know the risks of the virus by now.  We know how the number of deaths from the virus is but a fraction of not even one percent of the population.  We know that the majority of those cases had other underlying health problems.

We know how the the excuse for the shutdown was initially based on the faulty model of John Hopkins University, and the reason given was so as not to overwhelm the hospitals. We know that the hospitals are NOT overwhelmed, and that people who needed other medical treatment suffered, as a result of the U.S. health care industry focusing ONLY on Covid cases. We know that the reason now given for the shutdown is so there are not a great number of fatalities. The justification to take away our freedoms and the end date keeps changing and extending. And this is NOT OK.

Some predict the virus could be around forever. We pray not. Will you consent to live as a  hermit locked up in your home, never again going to a concert, gym, church, or event with 96% of society shut down for the rest of your life?! LIFE is a risk. Being a frightened hermit is not living. 

The flu vaccine fails around 60% of the time, and around 55% of Americans don’t get it. A vaccine is not going to save the world from the virus.  Half of Americans may not get it, it will not create herd immunity, and it will have a significant failure rate, because man–despite his arrogance–is not God, and has not conquered nature.  Some vaccines pose health risks themselves.  Waiting for a vaccine to get our freedoms back is NOT an option. Freedom is non-negotiable and has no contingencies.

Those that value life, freedom, and music must fight for their rights and help fight to END this unconstitutional suspension of our human rights to liberty, freedom, and the pursuit of happiness and right to peaceably assemble.

Anything less than an IMMEDIATE end to the shutdown NOW is unacceptable. Those that WANT to hide and stay home CAN. Those that WANT to wear a mask (that does nothing unless it is N95) CAN. Those that do not want to wear a mask–should not have to. If a mask actually worked–than those that wore them would not have to worry about those that didn’t.  People are smart enough to know the risks of the virus. Those that want to wear masks at concerts can.

Those that WANT to be a free human being, perform, sing, gig, tour, dance, and go to clubs and concerts MUST have that right NOW. 

Stand for freedom. And stand for MUSIC. MUSIC IS LIFE. 

Music video of Elliphant “Music Is Life” featuring Ras Fraser Jr. Music produced by: Tommy Tysper ℗ © 2013 Record Company TEN Purchase here: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/mus… Directed by: Sebastian Reed Edited by: Sebastian Reed Production Company: Camp David Film DOP: Niklas Panthell Focus Puller: Simon Bengtsson Winsten Styling: Tommie X Colourist: Nanna Dalunde Online: Frost VFX Follow Elliphant: Facebook: http://facebook.com/elliphantmusic Twitter: http://twitter.com/elliphantmusic Soundcloud: http://soundcloud.com/elliphantmusic Instagram: http://instagram.com/elliphantmusic 

Starpower Management CEO Bruce Edwin is now offering FREE advice to fine artists, bands, singers, models, actors, producers, writers, directors, and more on HOW TO SURVIVE DURING THE PANDEMIC and come out stronger than ever before when the insane shutdown is over. Email questions to StarpowerManagementLLC@gmail.com or leave questions at 310-226-7176. Those selected will potentially have their question and answer published for the world to hear or see here at Hollywood Sentinel dot com.