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GRAMMY Hall of Fame® Adds Public Enemy Among More

GRAMMY HALL OF FAME® WELCOMES RECORDINGS BY NEIL DIAMOND, EURYTHMICS, ELTON JOHN, JONI MITCHELL, THE POLICE, NANCY SINATRA AND MORE AS 2020 INDUCTIONS

26 RECORDINGS ADDED TO ICONIC CATALOG RESIDING AT THE GRAMMY MUSEUM®

The Recording Academy® welcomes the newest inductions to its distinguished GRAMMY Hall Of Fame®, continuing its ongoing commitment to preserving and celebrating timeless recordings. This year’s additions recognize a diverse range of both single and album recordings at least 25 years old that exhibit qualitative or historical significance. Recordings are reviewed each year by a special member committee comprised of eminent and knowledgeable professionals from all branches of the recording arts, with final approval by the Recording Academy’s National Board of Trustees. With 26 new titles, the Hall, now in its 47th year, currently totals 1,114 recordings.

“Each year it is our distinct privilege to preserve a piece of cultural and music history with our GRAMMY Hall Of Fame inductions,” said Deborah Dugan, President/CEO of the Recording Academy. “We are so honored to welcome these timeless masterpieces to our growing catalog of iconic recordings that serve as a beacon of music excellence and diverse expression that will forever impact and inspire generations of creators.”

The 2020 GRAMMY Hall Of Fame inductees range from Neil Diamond’s “Sweet Caroline (Good Times Never Seemed So Good)” to Joni Mitchell’s Clouds. The list also features Eurhythmics’ “Sweet Dreams (Are Made Of This),” Elton John’s “Tiny Dancer,” Devo’s Q: Are We Not Men? A: We Are Devo!, Swan Silvertones’ “Oh Mary Don’t You Weep,” and Public Enemy’s It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back.

Other inductees include recordings by the Allman Brothers Band, the Chuck Wagon Gang, Patsy Cline, Dick Dale And The Del-Tones, Bo Diddley, Peter Frampton, the King Cole Trio, Skip James, James P. Johnson, Machito, Taj Mahal, Willie Nelson and Merle Haggard, the Police, Blind Alfred Reed, Joshua Rifkin, Nancy Sinatra, the Stanley Brothers & The Clinch Mountain Boys, the Surfaris, and Mary Lou Williams.

Eligible recipients will receive an official certificate from the Recording Academy.

For a full list of 2020 recordings inducted into the GRAMMY Hall Of Fame, see below.

The 62nd Annual GRAMMY Awards®, which will be broadcast live on Sunday, Jan. 26, 2020, at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT on the CBS Television Network.

2020 GRAMMY Hall Of Fame Inductees

AFRO-CUBAN JAZZ SUITE
“Afro-Cuban Jazz Suite”
Machito
Mercury (1950)
Track

CAPITOL PRESENTS THE KING COLE TRIO
The King Cole Trio
Capitol (1944)
Album

“CAROLINA SHOUT”
James P. Johnson
OKeh (1921)
Single

CLOUDS
Joni Mitchell
Reprise (1969)
Album

“DEVIL GOT MY WOMAN”
Skip James
Paramount (1931)
Single

EAT A PEACH
The Allman Brothers Band
Capricorn (1972)
Album

“EVERY BREATHE YOU TAKE”
The Police
A&M (1983)
Single

FRAMPTON COMES ALIVE!
Peter Frampton
A&M (1976)
Album

“HOW CAN A POOR MAN STAND SUCH TIMES AND LIVE”
Blind Alfred Reed
Victor (1930)
Single

“I’LL FLY AWAY”
The Chuck Wagon Gang
Columbia (1949)
Single

“I’M A MAN”
Bo Diddley
Checker (1955)
Single

“I’M A MAN OF CONSTANT SORROW”
The Stanley Brothers & The Clinch Mountain Boys
Columbia (1951)
Single

IT TAKES A NATION OF MILLIONS TO HOLD US BACK
Public Enemy
Def Jam (1988)
Album

“MISERLOU”
Dick Dale And The Del-Tones
Deltone (1962)
Single

“OH MARY DON’T YOU WEEP”
Swan Silvertones
Vee-Jay (1959)
Single

“PANCHO AND LEFTY”
Willie Nelson And Merle Haggard
Epic (1982)
Single

PIANO RAGS BY SCOTT JOPLIN
Joshua Rifkin
Nonesuch (1970)
Album

Q: ARE WE NOT MEN? A: WE ARE DEVO!
Devo
Warner Bros. (1978)
Album

“SWEET CAROLINE (GOOD TIMES NEVER SEEMED SO GOOD)”
Neil Diamond
Uni (1969)
Single

“SWEET DREAMS (ARE MADE OF THIS)”
Eurythmics
RCA (1983)
Single

TAJ MAHAL
Taj Mahal
Columbia (1968)
Album

“THESE BOOTS ARE MADE FOR WALKIN'”
Nancy Sinatra
Reprise (1965)
Single

“TINY DANCER”
Elton John
Uni (1972)
Single

“WALKIN’ AFTER MIDNIGHT”
Patsy Cline
Decca (1957)
Single

“WIPE OUT”
The Surfaris
Dot (1963)
Single

ZODIAC SUITE
Mary Lou Williams
Asch (1945)
Album

With kind courtesy to The Recording Academy® 2020,  Eurythmics are courtesy of RCA/SONY/BMG, and Public Enemy are courtesy of Columbia/Def Jam.  All rights reserved.

Concerns Raised Over School Mental Health Screening and Psychotropic Drugs

Harmful mental health assessments, evaluations, and programs in  schools can lead to increase in psychiatric drug use linked to causing—not preventing—suicide and violence, rising evidence shows. Parents can protect children however, using federal law.

Citizens Commission on Human Rights International have discovered that harmful mental health assessments, evaluations, and programs in  schools can lead to increase in psychiatric drug use linked to causing suicide and violence.

“Psychotropic drugs are increasingly prescribed for children who show nothing more than children’s typical rambunctious behavior. Many children have suffered harmful effects from these drugs.” — Ron Paul, Former U.S. Congressman

Invasive, subjective mental health screening of schoolchildren is sweeping the nation with governments ignoring the potential harmful impact of this, the Citizens Commission on Human Rights International (CCHR) has documented. Behavioral screening can often lead to children being prescribed psychotropic drugs that can drive them to suicide, not prevent it. One program, TeenScreen, was stopped after it was found to have an 84% false positive rate that could lead to teens being put on antidepressants. Yet it is now making a comeback.[1]

The push for more school-based mental health intervention has increased following a spate of high profile school shootings. But there’s no guarantee that screening can identify those who may become potentially violent or suicidal. CCHR urges parents to be aware of their rights under the Federal Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (also known as the Hatch Amendment) that requires parental notice and consent before a child can be subjected to behavioral screening.[2] To assist parents, CCHR produced a form letter that parents can use.

CCHR says that governments or agencies such as Medicaid do not investigate the role of behavioral screening in increasing psychiatric drug prescriptions and how these drugs cause suicide and other adverse effects.

A former clinical director of Kingsboro Psychiatric Center in New York described the “mental health screening program” created by the 2003 US New Freedom Commission on Mental Health as “a colossal fraud.” Further, “It is presented as a way of ferreting out hidden ‘mental illness,’ first in schoolchildren, so they can then get ‘appropriate treatment’—medications. It is actually a brazen attempt to hide the injuries caused by 50 years of peddling increasingly harmful and increasingly costly psychiatric drugs….The greatest fraud underlying the program is that ‘mental illness’ is best treated by drugs. The sad fact is that, as a group, psychiatric drugs impair brain function, thus producing or aggravating mental illness.”[3]

It is “just a way to put more people on prescription drugs,” said Marcia Angell, a medical ethics lecturer at Harvard Medical School and author of The Truth About Drug Companies.[4] Based on the estimates given by TeenScreen on the number of students screened that could be potentially prescribed drugs, the pharmaceutical industry stood to make an additional $30 billion a year in drug sales.

Feeding that is the Medicaid Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis and Treatment (EPSDT) law, which requires states to provide Medicaid-eligible children regular mental health screenings.[5] The impact is telling, CCHR says. A JAMA Pediatrics study published in 2018 assessed patterns of psychotropic drug use in children insured by Medicaid, finding that by age 8 years, 10.2% of the children had received a psychotropic drug, 16.4% were prescribed two drug classes concomitantly, while 4.3% received three or more classes concomitantly for 60 days or more.[6]

According to IQvia, 7.2 million 0-17 year olds in the U.S., including the non-Medicaid population, are on psychiatric drugs, with 1,194,805 prescribed antipsychotics. Over 3.6 million are prescribed psychostimulants and 1.4 million are given anti-anxiety (sedative hypnotic) drugs.[7]

Antidepressants were prescribed to 2.1 million, despite a Food and Drug Administration Black Box warning that the drugs may induce suicidal reactions in this age group.

With psychiatrists estimating that antidepressants are unlikely to “work” in 30% of those taking them that could generate 630,000 candidates for electroshock treatment, the passage of up to 460 volts of electricity through children’s developing brains, permanently damaging them.

An analysis of 70 trials of the most common antidepressants—involving more than 18,000 people—found the drugs doubled the risk of suicide and aggressive behavior in under 18s.[8]

CCHR breaks down IQVia’s statistics on its Fight For Kids website:
0-1 Years 125,361
2-3 Years 202,319
4-5 Years 306,079
6-12 Years 3,259,955
13-17 Years 3,419,633 [9]

With this drug usage, it is not surprising, CCHR says, that the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that the fastest-growing sector for completed suicides nationwide is among children 10 to 14 years old. Suicide rates tripled for that age group, from 2007 to 2017 to 2.5 deaths per 100,000 children.[10]

However, data collection on how many were taking a psychiatric drug or going through withdrawal at the time of ending their life—regardless of the method used—is not publicly reported. CCHR says this is important information to record.

A study published in Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology in June 2014 found that psychotropic drugs could make people nearly six times more likely to kill themselves, while having spent time in the previous year in a psychiatric hospital makes them over 44 times more likely to kill themselves.[11]

Former U.S. Congressman Ron Paul, a practicing physician for more than 30 years, denounced the mental health screening program as a pipeline for putting more children on psychotropic drugs, stating: “[P]sychotropic drugs are increasingly prescribed for children who show nothing more than children’s typical rambunctious behavior. Many children have suffered harmful effects from these drugs.” Additionally, “The federal government should not promote national mental-health screening programs that will force the use of these psychotropic drugs….”[12]

Visit: www.CCHR.org 

References:

[1] Karen R. Effrem, M.D., “Dangerously Flawed ‘TeenScreen’ Mental Health Program Returning to Schools,” The National Pulse, 4 Dec. 2018, thenationalpulse.com/commentary/dangerously-flawed-teenscreen-mental-health-program-returning-schools/; www.cchrint.org/2012/11/27/teenscreen-shuts-down/
[2] www2.ed.gov/policy/gen/guid/fpco/ppra/parents.html
[3] “The Dangers or Mental Health Screening,” 23 Sept. 2005, psychrights.org/Issues/Screening/LehrmanDangersofScreening.pdf
[4] nypost.com/2004/12/05/pill-pushers-in-hs-suicide-screening-program/
[5] www.nami.org/learn-more/public-policy/mental-health-screening
[6] www.uspharmacist.com/article/many-young-children-insured-by-medicaid-are-prescribed-psychotropic-drugs
[7] www.cchrint.org/2019/11/13/new-fight-for-kids-site-launched-to-inform-parents-and-protect-children-from-documented-psychotropic-drug-risks/
[8] “Antidepressants can raise the risk of suicide, biggest ever review finds,” The Telegraph (UK), 27 Jan. 2016, www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2016/03/14/antidepressants-can-raise-the-risk-of-suicide-biggest-ever-revie/
[9] www.fightforkids.org/number-of-children-taking-psychiatric-drugs
[10] “On the cutting edge of preventing child suicide: Universal screening,” The Gazette, 8 Dec. 2019, gazette.com/premium/on-the-cutting-edge-of-preventing-child-suicide-universal-screening/article_b3bb81c6-0ca5-11ea-9129-cfcda7508d71.html
[11] Matthew M. Large, Christopher J. Ryan, “Disturbing findings about the risk of suicide and psychiatric hospitals,” Soc. Psychiatry Psychiatr Epidemiology (2014), 49: 1353-1355, link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs00127-014-0912-2.pdf.
[12] “Mandatory Mental Health Screening Threatens Privacy, Parental Rights,” Fox News, 17 Sept. 2004

92nd OSCARS® Nominations Announced

Academy President David Rubin introduces the nominations for the 92nd Annual Academy Awards in Beverly Hills, on Monday, January 13, 2020. Photo credit: Todd Wawrychuk / ©A.M.P.A.S.

Actor-producer John Cho and producer-actress-writer Issa Rae announced the 92nd Oscars® nominations today (January 13), live from the David Geffen Theater at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, opening later this year, via a global live stream on Oscar.com, Oscars.org, the Academy’s digital platforms, an international satellite feed and broadcast media.

Academy members from each of the 17 branches vote to determine the nominees in their respective categories – actors nominate actors, film editors nominate film editors, etc. In the Animated Feature Film and International Feature Film categories, nominees are selected by a vote of multi-branch screening committees. All voting members are eligible to select the Best Picture nominees. Active members of the Academy are eligible to vote for the winners in all 24 categories beginning Thursday, January 30, through Tuesday, February 4.

See the Oscar nominations below, with The Hollywood Sentinel’s predictions in bold. 

The 92nd Oscars will be held on Sunday, February 9, 2020, at the Dolby® Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center® in Hollywood, and will be televised live on ABC at 8 p.m. Eastern, 7 p.m. Central, and 5 p.m. Pacific.

“Oscars: Live on the Red Carpet” will air at 6:30 p.m. Eastern, 5:30 p.m. Central, and 3:30 p.m. Pacific. The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

Performance by an actor in a leading role
Antonio Banderas in “Pain and Glory”
Leonardo DiCaprio in “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood”
Adam Driver in “Marriage Story”
Joaquin Phoenix in “Joker”
Jonathan Pryce in “The Two Popes”

Performance by an actor in a supporting role
Tom Hanks in “A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood”
Anthony Hopkins in “The Two Popes”
Al Pacino in “The Irishman”
Joe Pesci in “The Irishman”
Brad Pitt in “Once upon a Time…in Hollywood”

Performance by an actress in a leading role
Cynthia Erivo in “Harriet”
Scarlett Johansson in “Marriage Story”
Saoirse Ronan in “Little Women”
Charlize Theron in “Bombshell”
Renée Zellweger in “Judy”

Performance by an actress in a supporting role
Kathy Bates in “Richard Jewell”
Laura Dern in “Marriage Story”
Scarlett Johansson in “Jojo Rabbit”
Florence Pugh in “Little Women”
Margot Robbie in “Bombshell”

Best animated feature film of the year
“How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World” Dean DeBlois, Bradford Lewis and Bonnie Arnold
“I Lost My Body” Jérémy Clapin and Marc du Pontavice
“Klaus” Sergio Pablos, Jinko Gotoh and Marisa Román
“Missing Link” Chris Butler, Arianne Sutner and Travis Knight
“Toy Story 4” Josh Cooley, Mark Nielsen and Jonas Rivera

Achievement in cinematography
“The Irishman” Rodrigo Prieto
“Joker” Lawrence Sher
“The Lighthouse” Jarin Blaschke
“1917” Roger Deakins
“Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Robert Richardson

Achievement in costume design
“The Irishman” Sandy Powell and Christopher Peterson
“Jojo Rabbit” Mayes C. Rubeo
“Joker” Mark Bridges
“Little Women” Jacqueline Durran
“Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Arianne Phillips

Achievement in directing
“The Irishman” Martin Scorsese
“Joker” Todd Phillips
“1917” Sam Mendes
“Once upon a Time…in Hollywood”
“Parasite” Bong Joon Ho

Best documentary feature
“American Factory” Steven Bognar, Julia Reichert and Jeff Reichert
“The Cave” Feras Fayyad, Kirstine Barfod and Sigrid Dyekjær
“The Edge of Democracy” Petra Costa, Joanna Natasegara, Shane Boris and Tiago Pavan
“For Sama” Waad al-Kateab and Edward Watts
“Honeyland” Ljubo Stefanov, Tamara Kotevska and Atanas Georgiev

Best documentary short subject
“In the Absence” Yi Seung-Jun and Gary Byung-Seok Kam
“Learning to Skateboard in a Warzone (If You’re a Girl)” Carol Dysinger and Elena Andreicheva
“Life Overtakes Me” John Haptas and Kristine Samuelson
“St. Louis Superman” Smriti Mundhra and Sami Khan
“Walk Run Cha-Cha” Laura Nix and Colette Sandstedt

Achievement in film editing
“Ford v Ferrari” Michael McCusker and Andrew Buckland
“The Irishman” Thelma Schoonmaker
“Jojo Rabbit” Tom Eagles
“Joker” Jeff Groth
“Parasite” Yang Jinmo

Best international feature film of the year
“Corpus Christi” Poland
“Honeyland” North Macedonia
“Les Misérables” France
“Pain and Glory” Spain
“Parasite” South Korea

Achievement in makeup and hairstyling
“Bombshell” Kazu Hiro, Anne Morgan and Vivian Baker
“Joker” Nicki Ledermann and Kay Georgiou
“Judy” Jeremy Woodhead
“Maleficent: Mistress of Evil” Paul Gooch, Arjen Tuiten and David White
“1917” Naomi Donne, Tristan Versluis and Rebecca Cole

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)
“Joker” Hildur Guðnadóttir
“Little Women” Alexandre Desplat
“Marriage Story” Randy Newman
“1917” Thomas Newman
“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” John Williams

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)
“I Can’t Let You Throw Yourself Away” from “Toy Story 4”
Music and Lyric by Randy Newman
“(I’m Gonna) Love Me Again” from “Rocketman”
Music by Elton John; Lyric by Bernie Taupin
“I’m Standing With You” from “Breakthrough”
Music and Lyric by Diane Warren
“Into The Unknown” from “Frozen II”
Music and Lyric by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez
“Stand Up” from “Harriet”
Music and Lyric by Joshuah Brian Campbell and Cynthia Erivo

Best motion picture of the year
“Ford v Ferrari” Peter Chernin, Jenno Topping and James Mangold, Producers
“The Irishman” Martin Scorsese, Robert De Niro, Jane Rosenthal and Emma Tillinger Koskoff, Producers
“Jojo Rabbit” Carthew Neal and Taika Waititi, Producers
“Joker” Todd Phillips, Bradley Cooper and Emma Tillinger Koskoff, Producers
“Little Women” Amy Pascal, Producer
“Marriage Story” Noah Baumbach and David Heyman, Producers
“1917” Sam Mendes, Pippa Harris, Jayne-Ann Tenggren and Callum McDougall, Producers
“Once upon a Time…in Hollywood”
“Parasite” Kwak Sin Ae and Bong Joon Ho, Producers

Achievement in production design
“The Irishman” Production Design: Bob Shaw; Set Decoration: Regina Graves
“Jojo Rabbit” Production Design: Ra Vincent; Set Decoration: Nora Sopková
“1917” Production Design: Dennis Gassner; Set Decoration: Lee Sandales
“Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Production Design: Barbara Ling; Set Decoration: Nancy Haigh
“Parasite” Production Design: Lee Ha Jun; Set Decoration: Cho Won Woo

Best animated short film
“Dcera (Daughter)” Daria Kashcheeva
“Hair Love” Matthew A. Cherry and Karen Rupert Toliver
“Kitbull” Rosana Sullivan and Kathryn Hendrickson
“Memorable” Bruno Collet and Jean-François Le Corre
“Sister” Siqi Song

Best live action short film
“Brotherhood” Meryam Joobeur and Maria Gracia Turgeon
“Nefta Football Club” Yves Piat and Damien Megherbi
“The Neighbors’ Window” Marshall Curry
“Saria” Bryan Buckley and Matt Lefebvre
“A Sister” Delphine Girard

Achievement in sound editing
“Ford v Ferrari” Donald Sylvester
“Joker” Alan Robert Murray
“1917” Oliver Tarney and Rachael Tate
“Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Wylie Stateman
“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” Matthew Wood and David Acord

Achievement in sound mixing
“Ad Astra” Gary Rydstrom, Tom Johnson and Mark Ulano
“Ford v Ferrari” Paul Massey, David Giammarco and Steven A. Morrow
“Joker” Tom Ozanich, Dean Zupancic and Tod Maitland
“1917” Mark Taylor and Stuart Wilson
“Once upon a Time…in Hollywood” Michael Minkler, Christian P. Minkler and Mark Ulano

Achievement in visual effects
“Avengers: Endgame” Dan DeLeeuw, Russell Earl, Matt Aitken and Dan Sudick
“The Irishman” Pablo Helman, Leandro Estebecorena, Nelson Sepulveda-Fauser and Stephane Grabli
“The Lion King” Robert Legato, Adam Valdez, Andrew R. Jones and Elliot Newman
“1917” Guillaume Rocheron, Greg Butler and Dominic Tuohy
“Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker” Roger Guyett, Neal Scanlan, Patrick Tubach and Dominic Tuohy

Adapted screenplay
“The Irishman” Screenplay by Steven Zaillian
“Jojo Rabbit” Screenplay by Taika Waititi
“Joker” Written by Todd Phillips & Scott Silver
“Little Women” Written for the screen by Greta Gerwig
“The Two Popes” Written by Anthony McCarten

Original screenplay
“Knives Out” Written by Rian Johnson
“Marriage Story” Written by Noah Baumbach
“1917” Written by Sam Mendes & Krysty Wilson-Cairns
“Once upon a Time…in Hollywood”
“Parasite” Screenplay by Bong Joon Ho, Han Jin Won; Story by Bong Joon Ho

The Hollywood Sentinel, with kind courtesy to The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences®, 2020