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Success In Hollywood

Success in any endeavor, including Hollywood, entails 4 things.

1, Knowing what you want

2, Knowing why you want it

3, Knowing how to get it, and

4, Knowing where you are now

This seems simple enough, but remarkably, most people don’t follow this simple formula or know it. Having seen over ten thousand models and actors in-person, and spoken with over fifty thousand by phone over the years, we have learned some things about artists goals. Most artists say they want to be an actor or model or band, singer, producer, writer, etc., but don’t know the steps involved.

Let’s break them down one by one.

1, Knowing what you want includes knowing what you do not want. What could you know you do not want? You may want to be an actor or actress. OK, what is wrong with that? The first problem is WANTING it. When you want something, you keep it far away from you. Don’t want to be something you are not. Just BE it. In other words, stop saying that you want to be a director, just direct. Shoot something—anything—even on your phone, and then start CALLING yourself a director. Be what you want to be. In present time. When you refer to yourself as that which you want to be, then you are no longer searching in future tense. You now ARE, in the present. And when you treat yourself as you want to be, then others will start to as well. And, we generally behave ourselves in the manner in which others treat us.

Now that we have the covered, what KIND of actor, director, artist, or person do you want to be? A poor one? One who no one knows outside of your close friends and family? Or a world famous one? Do you want to be famous and then die broke and poor and miserable? Winning no awards, and everyone forgets your name? Do you want to be famous for anything? Even robbing a bank? Or do you want to a top, respected, award winning star, respected and admired widely around the world, forever?

The problem with most people, including artists when it comes to reaching their goals, is that they don’t have clearly defined goals.

You MUST clearly define your goal.

And by realizing what you do NOT want, you will better focus on what you DO want. So, write out your goal. Do it NOW. What do you want? Write down your goals and review them daily, before bed, and when you wake up and throughout the day.

2, WHY do you want it?

Do you want to be a famous singer because you want to be rich? That’s the wrong reason if that is the ONLY reason. Why, is because there are far easier ways to get rich than being an entertainer. Do you want to a famous director because you love a film that changed your life and you think it looks easy and fun? This also may not be the right reason. Find the reason WHY you want what you want, and make sure that it is stronger than anything you can imagine doing. You must be hugely passionate about it.

3, Now, how do you get it?

One simple method to get what you want, is to observe the paths of others in your chosen field, and see how they got what it is YOU want. Certainly, not all people are the same and thus not all paths are the same, but you may find some similarities—some clues of direction that you too can workably follow. This means—study the successful, and also get a mentor. Get someone that will teach and guide you, and hold you accountable to your goals. It has never been easier to get free or low cost education, training, or mentorship from the biggest, richest, most famous, and most talent people in entertainment than now.

If you are seeking to prosper in any area of the arts to a higher position than you are now, and you have not signed up for Master Class, what are you waiting for? You would be kind of crazy not to in my opinion. Natalie Portman teaching acting?! Martin Scorsese, Jody Foster, and Spike Lee teaching filmmaking?! Alicia Keys and St. Vincent teaching music?! Seriously?! Master Class is a GOLD MINE of information from the top of the top. And it’s inexpensive. And no, they are NOT paying me!

4, Know where you are now.

This is important to note, because most people aspiring to be great in Hollywood do not know where they are now. They are either stuck in the past, as in past mistakes and hang ups, or they are stuck in the future, as in—they think they are a star NOW, when they are nothing of the sort. They may be good at dreaming and playing make-believe of what they want and where they want to be, but they get confused and start believing that they really ARE as great as they want to be. And then when Hollywood—meaning the agents, managers, casting directors, or others don’t agree that they are not yet ready to be a star, or not talented enough—they go ballistic and become verbally abusive, or start slandering or libeling those in the industry that don’t share their opinion of their greatness. Or they have meltdown and crawl back to wherever it is they came from, forever scarred and dejected. I’ve seen this all play out, again and again. Don’t let this be you.

Know WHERE you are now. Be brutally honest with yourself. But then—forgive yourself for whatever it is you think you did wrong. And move on to make yourself better and better day by day.

A good idea is to at times, operate just a few minutes in the future.

In other words, instead of being in your head stuck in the past or stuck in your future idea of yourself a year from now, operate with your mindset just a few minutes ahead, so that you are envisioning what you want minutes from now, just ahead of present time. In this manner, you will be generally in the here and now when it comes to your goals, but will be operating slightly ahead of the curve, so that your vision helps to manifest your present reality. With intention, and without delusion.

For example, lets say you are calling up a top manager whose phone number you just discovered, and you want to ask them to represent yourself. You have read all about them, got the name of the CEO written down, researched him or her, and are now reading to call. Instead of worrying about whether or not they will take your call or reject you, you are instead “predicting” seconds into each moment of the future, exactly what will happen. Your thoughts therefore should be something like this, “They are going to answer and take my call now. They are going to put me right through to the CEO. They are taking my call. They like me. We are getting along so well. I made them laugh. They are interested in me. They are going to look at my reel and meet me. They are signing me!” Your talk to your self should be like this ALL the time. Words and thoughts are the precursor to actions, and therefore they are POWERFUL. Use your words and your thoughts wisely! Bless yourself, don’t curse yourself! PREDICT the future you want to create, and speak of it happening in the present tense. What we think and expect is often what we create into existence.

Remember, you are your greatest enemy in Hollywood, and the greatest enemy to your success—or—your best friend and your best helper.

Are you going to be your best friend, or your best enemy? You know what you need to choose. So do it now.

I’m not talking about sports games, or only one position that is open and only decided by one person. But generally speaking, in terms of the overall goals for yourself, no one has the power to make you win or lose, to succeed or fail. Only YOU do. There are enough people on planet Earth to help you reach the highest goals you have envisioned for yourself. You do not need a million people to help you. You do not even need a thousand, or a hundred people to help you. You only need one. It’s not a matter of CAN you succeed, it is a matter of WHEN. And that when is up to you. When YOU are ready, then you will.

I hope this has helped you.

For answers to specific questions you may have, contact us here at the front of this site, or below, and your question may be answered and published here in our next or future issue, for the world to see.

Note: The offices of Bruce Edwin and his affiliated companies do NOT accept unsolicited queries for screenplays or stories.

The Office of Bruce Edwin: Tel: 310-226-7176

This content is ©2021, Bruce Edwin Productions, Hollywood Sentinel, all world rights reserved.

 

 

 

93rd Oscars® Nominations Announced

 Actor-producer Priyanka Chopra Jonas and singer, songwriter and actor Nick Jonas announced the 93rd Oscars® nominations today (March 15), live from London.

Academy members from each of the 17 branches vote to determine the nominees in their respective categories – actors nominate actors, film editors nominate film editors, etc. In the Animated Feature Film and International Feature Film categories, nominees are selected by a vote of multi-branch screening committees. All voting members are eligible to select the Best Picture nominees.

Active members of the Academy are eligible to vote for the winners in all 23 categories beginning Thursday, April 15, through Tuesday, April 20.

The 93rd Oscars will be held on Sunday, April 25, 2021, at Union Station Los Angeles and the Dolby® Theatre at Hollywood & Highland Center® in Hollywood, and will be televised live on ABC at 8 p.m. ET/5 p.m. PT.  The Oscars also will be televised live in more than 225 countries and territories worldwide.

Nominations for the 93rd Academy Awards

Best motion picture of the year

  • “The Father” David Parfitt, Jean-Louis Livi and Philippe Carcassonne, Producers
  • “Judas and the Black Messiah” Shaka King, Charles D. King and Ryan Coogler, Producers
  • “Mank” Ceán Chaffin, Eric Roth and Douglas Urbanski, Producers
  • “Minari” Christina Oh, Producer
  • “Nomadland” Frances McDormand, Peter Spears, Mollye Asher, Dan Janvey and Chloé Zhao, Producers
  • “Promising Young Woman” Ben Browning, Ashley Fox, Emerald Fennell and Josey McNamara, Producers
  • “Sound of Metal” Bert Hamelinck and Sacha Ben Harroche, Producers
  • “The Trial of the Chicago 7” Marc Platt and Stuart Besser, Producers

Best Motion Picture of the Year–Nomination Facts:

The Father (Sony Pictures Classics) – David Parfitt, Jean-Louis Livi and Philippe Carcassonne, producers – This is the second Best
Picture nomination for David Parfitt. He won an Oscar for Shakespeare in Love (1998).
This is the first nomination for both Jean-Louis Livi and Philippe Carcassonne.
Judas and the Black Messiah (Warner Bros.) – Shaka King, Charles D. King and Ryan Coogler, producers – This is the first Best
Picture nomination for all three.
Mank (Netflix) – Ceán Chaffin, Eric Roth and Douglas Urbanski, producers – This is the third Best Picture nomination for Ceán
Chaffin. Her other nominations were for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008) and The Social Network (2010).
This is the first Best Picture nomination for Eric Roth.
This is the second Best Picture nomination for Douglas Urbanski. His other nomination was for Darkest Hour (2017).
Minari (A24) – Christina Oh, producer – This is her first nomination.
Nomadland (Searchlight) – Frances McDormand, Peter Spears, Mollye Asher, Dan Janvey and Chloé Zhao, producers – This is the
first Best Picture nomination for Frances McDormand, Mollye Asher and Chloé Zhao.
This is the second Best Picture nomination for Peter Spears. His other nomination was for Call Me by Your Name (2017).
This is the second Best Picture nomination for Dan Janvey. His other nomination was for Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012).
Promising Young Woman (Focus Features) – Ben Browning, Ashley Fox, Emerald Fennell and Josey McNamara, producers – This is
the first Best Picture nomination for all four.
Sound of Metal (Amazon Studios) – Bert Hamelinck and Sacha Ben Harroche, producers – This is the first nomination for both.
The Trial of the Chicago 7 (Netflix) – Marc Platt and Stuart Besser, producers – This is the third Best Picture nomination for Marc
Platt. His other nominations were for Bridge of Spies (2015) and La La Land (2016).
This is the first nomination for Stuart Besser.

Performance by an actor in a leading role

  • Riz Ahmed in “Sound of Metal”
  • Chadwick Boseman in “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”
  • Anthony Hopkins in “The Father”
  • Gary Oldman in “Mank”
  • Steven Yeun in “Minari”

Performance by an actor in a supporting role

  • Sacha Baron Cohen in “The Trial of the Chicago 7”
  • Daniel Kaluuya in “Judas and the Black Messiah”
  • Leslie Odom, Jr. in “One Night in Miami…”
  • Paul Raci in “Sound of Metal”
  • Lakeith Stanfield in “Judas and the Black Messiah”

Performance by an actress in a leading role

  • Viola Davis in “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom”
  • Andra Day in “The United States vs. Billie Holiday”
  • Vanessa Kirby in “Pieces of a Woman”
  • Frances McDormand in “Nomadland”
  • Carey Mulligan in “Promising Young Woman”

Performance by an actress in a supporting role

  • Maria Bakalova in “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan”
  • Glenn Close in “Hillbilly Elegy”
  • Olivia Colman in “The Father”
  • Amanda Seyfried in “Mank”
  • Yuh-Jung Youn in “Minari”

Best animated feature film of the year

  • “Onward” Dan Scanlon and Kori Rae
  • “Over the Moon” Glen Keane, Gennie Rim and Peilin Chou
  • “A Shaun the Sheep Movie: Farmageddon” Richard Phelan, Will Becher and Paul Kewley
  • “Soul” Pete Docter and Dana Murray
  • “Wolfwalkers” Tomm Moore, Ross Stewart, Paul Young and Stéphan Roelants

Achievement in cinematography

  • “Judas and the Black Messiah” Sean Bobbitt
  • “Mank” Erik Messerschmidt
  • “News of the World” Dariusz Wolski
  • “Nomadland” Joshua James Richards
  • “The Trial of the Chicago 7” Phedon Papamichael

Achievement in costume design

  • “Emma” Alexandra Byrne
  • “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” Ann Roth
  • “Mank” Trish Summerville
  • “Mulan” Bina Daigeler
  • “Pinocchio” Massimo Cantini Parrini

Achievement in directing

  • “Another Round” Thomas Vinterberg
  • “Mank” David Fincher
  • “Minari” Lee Isaac Chung
  • “Nomadland” Chloé Zhao
  • “Promising Young Woman” Emerald Fennell

Best documentary feature

  • “Collective” Alexander Nanau and Bianca Oana
  • “Crip Camp” Nicole Newnham, Jim LeBrecht and Sara Bolder
  • “The Mole Agent” Maite Alberdi and Marcela Santibáñez
  • “My Octopus Teacher” Pippa Ehrlich, James Reed and Craig Foster
  • “Time” Garrett Bradley, Lauren Domino and Kellen Quinn

Best documentary short subject

  • “Colette” Anthony Giacchino and Alice Doyard
  • “A Concerto Is a Conversation” Ben Proudfoot and Kris Bowers
  • “Do Not Split” Anders Hammer and Charlotte Cook
  • “Hunger Ward” Skye Fitzgerald and Michael Scheuerman
  • “A Love Song for Latasha” Sophia Nahli Allison and Janice Duncan

Achievement in film editing

  • “The Father” Yorgos Lamprinos
  • “Nomadland” Chloé Zhao
  • “Promising Young Woman” Frédéric Thoraval
  • “Sound of Metal” Mikkel E. G. Nielsen
  • “The Trial of the Chicago 7” Alan Baumgarten

Best international feature film of the year

  • “Another Round” Denmark
  • “Better Days” Hong Kong
  • “Collective” Romania
  • “The Man Who Sold His Skin” Tunisia
  • “Quo Vadis, Aida?” Bosnia and Herzegovina

Achievement in makeup and hairstyling

  • “Emma” Marese Langan, Laura Allen and Claudia Stolze
  • “Hillbilly Elegy” Eryn Krueger Mekash, Matthew Mungle and Patricia Dehaney
  • “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” Sergio Lopez-Rivera, Mia Neal and Jamika Wilson
  • “Mank” Gigi Williams, Kimberley Spiteri and Colleen LaBaff
  • “Pinocchio” Mark Coulier, Dalia Colli and Francesco Pegoretti

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original score)

  • “Da 5 Bloods” Terence Blanchard
  • “Mank” Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross
  • “Minari” Emile Mosseri
  • “News of the World” James Newton Howard
  • “Soul” Trent Reznor, Atticus Ross and Jon Batiste

Achievement in music written for motion pictures (Original song)

  • “Fight For You” from “Judas and the Black Messiah”
    Music by H.E.R. and Dernst Emile II; Lyric by H.E.R. and Tiara Thomas
  • “Hear My Voice” from “The Trial of the Chicago 7”
    Music by Daniel Pemberton; Lyric by Daniel Pemberton and Celeste Waite
  • “Husavik” from “Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga”
    Music and Lyric by Savan Kotecha, Fat Max Gsus and Rickard Göransson
  • “Io Sì (Seen)” from “The Life Ahead (La Vita Davanti a Se)”
    Music by Diane Warren; Lyric by Diane Warren and Laura Pausini
  • “Speak Now” from “One Night in Miami…”
    Music and Lyric by Leslie Odom, Jr. and Sam Ashworth

Achievement in production design

  • “The Father” Production Design: Peter Francis; Set Decoration: Cathy Featherstone
  • “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” Production Design: Mark Ricker; Set Decoration: Karen O’Hara and Diana Stoughton
  • “Mank” Production Design: Donald Graham Burt; Set Decoration: Jan Pascale
  • “News of the World” Production Design: David Crank; Set Decoration: Elizabeth Keenan
  • “Tenet” Production Design: Nathan Crowley; Set Decoration: Kathy Lucas

Best animated short film

  • “Burrow” Madeline Sharafian and Michael Capbarat
  • “Genius Loci” Adrien Mérigeau and Amaury Ovise
  • “If Anything Happens I Love You” Will McCormack and Michael Govier
  • “Opera” Erick Oh
  • “Yes-People” Gísli Darri Halldórsson and Arnar Gunnarsson

Best live action short film

  • “Feeling Through” Doug Roland and Susan Ruzenski
  • “The Letter Room” Elvira Lind and Sofia Sondervan
  • “The Present” Farah Nabulsi
  • “Two Distant Strangers” Travon Free and Martin Desmond Roe
  • “White Eye” Tomer Shushan and Shira Hochman

Achievement in sound

  • “Greyhound” Warren Shaw, Michael Minkler, Beau Borders and David Wyman
  • “Mank” Ren Klyce, Jeremy Molod, David Parker, Nathan Nance and Drew Kunin
  • “News of the World” Oliver Tarney, Mike Prestwood Smith, William Miller and John Pritchett
  • “Soul” Ren Klyce, Coya Elliott and David Parker
  • “Sound of Metal” Nicolas Becker, Jaime Baksht, Michelle Couttolenc, Carlos Cortés and Phillip Bladh

Achievement in visual effects

  • “Love and Monsters” Matt Sloan, Genevieve Camilleri, Matt Everitt and Brian Cox
  • “The Midnight Sky” Matthew Kasmir, Christopher Lawrence, Max Solomon and David Watkins
  • “Mulan” Sean Faden, Anders Langlands, Seth Maury and Steve Ingram
  • “The One and Only Ivan” Nick Davis, Greg Fisher, Ben Jones and Santiago Colomo Martinez
  • “Tenet” Andrew Jackson, David Lee, Andrew Lockley and Scott Fisher

Adapted screenplay

  • “Borat Subsequent Moviefilm: Delivery of Prodigious Bribe to American Regime for Make Benefit Once Glorious Nation of Kazakhstan” Screenplay by Sacha Baron Cohen & Anthony Hines & Dan Swimer & Peter Baynham & Erica Rivinoja & Dan Mazer & Jena Friedman & Lee Kern; Story by Sacha Baron Cohen & Anthony Hines & Dan Swimer & Nina Pedrad
  • “The Father” Screenplay by Christopher Hampton and Florian Zeller
  • “Nomadland” Written for the screen by Chloé Zhao
  • “One Night in Miami…” Screenplay by Kemp Powers
  • “The White Tigers” Written for the screen by Ramin Bahrani

Original screenplay

  • “Judas and the Black Messiah” Screenplay by Will Berson & Shaka King; Story by Will Berson & Shaka King and Kenny Lucas & Keith Lucas
  • “Minari” Written by Lee Isaac Chung
  • “Promising Young Woman” Written by Emerald Fennell
  • “Sound of Metal” Screenplay by Darius Marder & Abraham Marder; Story by Darius Marder & Derek Cianfrance
  • “The Trial of the Chicago 7” Written by Aaron Sorkin

ABOUT THE ACADEMY

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences is a global community of more than 10,000 of the most accomplished artists, filmmakers and executives working in film. In addition to celebrating and recognizing excellence in filmmaking through the Oscars, the Academy supports a wide range of initiatives to promote the art and science of the movies, including public programming, educational outreach and the upcoming Academy Museum of Motion Pictures.

For a complete list of nominees, visit the official Oscars website, www.oscar.com.

The artwork for the Oscars® this year comprises a selection of 6 graphic artists whose work appear on the key art.  We will be featuring each artist here in upcoming issues of the Hollywood Sentinel.

This content provided with kind courtesy of The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences® ©2021 AMPAS, all rights reserved.

 

     

Sex Trafficking & Social Media Exploitation

The Reality of Sex Trafficking and Social Media Exploitation

By Million Kids dot Org

 

Online enticement:

This is when someone purposely communicates with someone believed to be a child via the internet with the intent to commit a sexual offense like sextortion (blackmail over a naked image), sexual exploitation including child porn, or abduction possibly leading to sex trafficking.

Note: In California, if you are engaged in commercial sex/prostitution and are under the age of 18 it is called sex trafficking.

The National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) received 37,872 reports of online enticement in the U.S. in 2020 (up from 19,174 in 2019) and 98% of victims said they did not know the offender offline. NCMEC also registered 17,000 reports of possible child sex trafficking. One in six of the kids reported as missing or runaways were likely victims of sex trafficking.  Sex trafficking is the fastest growing crime in the U.S. California is usually the number one state for it, and three out of four victims are U.S. citizens.

Sex Trafficking:

Almost never does sex trafficking involve direct kidnapping like you may see in the movies, although that can happen (especially in familial incidents), but for 99% of local sex trafficking cases it is usually a girl being lured (“groomed”) into an online fantasy relationship. The victim messages and chats with the offender on the internet. The offender builds a rapport and relationship. Eventually the victim may sneak out to meet the offender in person and then poof the victim is missing.

For the girl it often starts out looking like a boyfriend and she may plan a future with him. Then it leads to sexual exploitation:  The trafficker may say, “I just need you to do this for my friend,” or “I’m short of money.” It escalates and he will start beating her up, and she is given a daily quota – often up to $1,000 a day or more.  If the girl doesn’t make enough money she may not get to eat. He will cut her off from her family and friends. She will find out she may just be one of three or four other girls he is controlling. If the pimp is part of a gang, she may get traded within the gang, and she may be traded between other gangs.

They will move her around, from motel to motel to motel. She will be advertised online and won’t know what name she is being sold under, or even what town she is in.

She will be locked in a motel room, monitored continuously, waiting for her next sex buyer, and threatened with violence or death against her or or family members or other loved ones if she tries to escape.

All the money she was forced to make is turned over to the pimp. She is feeling degraded and embarrassed. The situation is shame-based and it is similar to domestic violence in that the offender makes the girl feel that any violence is her fault, “if you had made your quota I wouldn’t have to beat you up” they will say. The girl blames herself and believes there is no one she can turn to for help.

Sextortion:

Another example of online enticement is sextortion. Kids will meet someone on the internet who asks for a naked photo. It is amazing how many will actually send out a photo. From there the offender begins to threaten and blackmail them for more sexually explicit photos and videos and in some cases even money.  It is important for teens to know, with sexting so prevalent, that having explicit or naked images of anyone under the age of eighteen is illegal – even if the image was taken or given with consent.

The CDC has said that 18,000 kids a day are sending a naked photo online. The University of Florida’s research shows 9,000 kids a day are being blackmailed, and the University of Toledo, Ohio said that 58% of them will go out and meet up with the blackmailer to try to get their image back (without telling their mom and dad) where they often get further violated or assaulted.

Prevention:

How do you prevent this happening to your kids? Start with honest communication from an early age. Talk about technology. It isn’t good or bad, but there are people who use it for bad things. Importantly we have to talk about sex before giving them access. Ask who owns the Internet and help them to understand it isn’t private. Talk about if they have ever thought where naked photos go when they hit send or who is watching their provocative dance on TikTok.  Do they understand anything posted or sent can end up being seen by anyone – even predators? They can.  Do they know what to do when they get a comment/message from a stranger telling them how beautiful or sexy they are? They should know to immediately delete it.  Even with privacy settings on, most social media apps still have ways for strangers to interface with children.

Stay on top of the video games they are playing, who they are chatting with and what apps they are using. Limit access to social media until age appropriate. Keep electronic devices where everyone can see them (no bedrooms), and no access to phones after bedtime. You may seem like the “mean” parent but when you consider the alternatives, you have to protect and stay on top of it for them.

What to Watch For:

Parents should watch for changes in behavior – you know your kids better than anyone else. Are they starting to cut themselves?  Or they can’t sleep or are always tired?  Maybe they become withdrawn, change their friends, their clothing or quit their extracurricular activities. Or they are missing school. You may walk into the room and they quickly close their device or put it away. They may quit eating for no reason. Maybe they start to run away. Don’t assume it is teen rebellion and spend the time to dig deeper. Sit down with them, you can calmly ask them if they have a naked photo on the internet or something more. It may be a tough conversation but much less tough than having your child disappear or be exploited.

What To Do:

If your child has been enticed or is being groomed, what parents need to understand is you aren’t arguing with your child or the offender, you are arguing with a fantasy the offender is creating. And when parents go to war with a fantasy they will lose. Remove your child’s blinders by asking questions that will lead them to realize they don’t know who this person is really.

If you think there is online enticement, even if you aren’t sure, it is important to contact local law enforcement (what is happening to your child may be part of a larger investigation). Report it to the app or video game company, and report it to NCMEC at 1.800.843.5678 or at www.cybertipline.org (they can also help get explicit images off the web). Your child (and you as parents) may need counseling to deal with the trauma. Don’t be afraid to get additional support.

Parents should understand their kids are connected to the entire world and the entire world is connected to them. They live in a world where they could have one million followers with 24/7 access. We all have to step from behind a veil of denial and educate and empower them to live in a world without borders and in homes without walls.

View our website at MillionKids.org where we offer much more information and educational training. Or feel free to reach out to us via the website or be emailing info@millionkids.org.

This page is (c) 2021, Million Kids dot Org. Provided with kind courtesy to The Hollywood Sentinel.