Tag Archives: The Broad

God is Real

One of the most brilliant artists on the planet today, the stunning GRIMES is back again with a bit of ultra VIOLENCE.  Don’t make mother nature and the women mad guys, unless you want some more hurricanes tearing down your doors.

satan on the Outside Looking In

POPPY is back with more MK ultra style brainwashing, death-worshipping, and Barbie meets satan, discussing things not fit to print here.  She has truly run off into dangerous territory and now there seems to be no turning back for the lost blonde-lamb gradually being led to the slaughter before her cult-programmed fans.  We won’t show you that downward spiral here; but instead, some TRUTH.

$atan has found his-her way into the grocery business this month. We will never be a good android, and you will NOT see us swiping our butts, foreheads, wrists, or hands at Whole Foods / Amazon for a 666 purchases in this or any other lifetime.

We interviewed Jack Grisham (TSOL) and Lydia Lunch back in the day …old school baby. Re-prints maybe?

LA-based singer and songwriter Annika Rose has shared the music video for her debut single “In The End” (TaP Records), directed by Danica Kleinknecht.  Annika states, “Filming this video was a really special experience as it’s something that I’ve wanted to do since I was a kid, It was amazing to have it finally come to fruition and help tell the story of my first single.”

Released last month, Annika’s debut single has been featured on Apple Music’s “A List Pop,” “Breaking Pop” and “Pop Chill” playlists as well as Spotify’s “Fresh Pop” and “On Point” playlists.

Subnormal states, “Annika reminds us a bit of early Alanis Morissette.  With a beautiful look, a beautiful voice, and an outstanding vocal range, and at just 17 years old, she is definitely one to watch out for. ” 

Another young new LA artist; Delacey has released a moody new single. With a mature, rich voice, Delacey has a strong career ahead of her.

While Delacey has continued to release new music this summer including “The Subway Song” and “Emily,” her debut single, “My Man” has continued to climb the charts and is currently #33 at Top 40 Radio in the US.

Originally from Orange County, Delacey started writing songs and playing piano at age seven while idolizing artists including Stevie Nicks and Billie Holiday.  She has co-written songs including Halsey’s “Without Me,” which topped the Billboard Hot 100 chart, as well as songs for Demi Lovato, Zara Larsson, and The Chainsmokers, among more.

After debuting her MAGDALENE show in May – twigs’ first live shows in nearly three years – FKA twigs announces nine additional North American dates on her headlining MAGDALENE tour. The North American leg of the tour begins November 3rd in Vancouver, making stops in major cities across the U.S. and Canada including LA, Denver, Chicago, Boston, and Brooklyn (see a full list of tour dates below).

MAGDALENE weaves a tapestry of sound, performance, costume, pole dancing, Wushu, set design and lighting. Inspired by the revolutionary 19th century concept of ‘Gesamtkunstwerk,’ or ‘total work of art,’ it is a complete experience. FKA twigs summons all that she has – technical mastery, creative brilliance and physical endurance – to transport her audience into a stunning artistic realm.

FKA twigs launched her MAGDALENE world tour with two sold-out nights each at LA’s Palace Theatre and NYC’s Park Avenue Armory, continuing on to play headlining shows in Berlin, London, and Sydney, and performing at Primavera Sound, We Love Green Festival, and Afropunk.

Subnormal magazine states “FKA twigs legendary video for her new song “Cellophane” below, subverts the ‘male-gaze’ and the degrading / predictable role of the female recording artist as ‘stripper-sex object-whore,’ to that of ‘elevated angel-woman-mother of all creation-and goddess incarnate.’  A true filmic masterpiece of visual work, and a stunning near a cappella delivery by Tahliah (FKA twigs) here, whose ethereal voice harkens to Julie Cruise’s work with David Lynch.  Reportedly citing “Germfree Adolescents” by X-Ray Spex as her favourite album of all time, and reportedly mentioning Siouxsie Sioux as an inspiration, FKA twigs is truly outstanding.” 

In the news: Some pop star got married. Like we care. Politicians are being idiots. What’s new?

Fake Climate Change 

If you are reading this and don’t believe in global warming or climate change, you need to stop reading this NOW and go back to kindergarten.

Political Piggies

The Center for Biological Diversity and allies sued the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service this week for failing to protect endangered species from coal mining in Appalachia in violation of the Endangered Species Act.

Pollution, razing forests and blasting is pushing aquatic animals to the brink of extinction due to heavy political interference from the Trump administration, the organization states.

“Trump appointees have enabled a rubber-stamp system allowing mountains to be blown up and streams to be polluted without protection for endangered species or the human communities of Appalachia,” said Tierra Curry, a senior scientist at the Center. “It’s illegal and immoral and it needs to stop.”

Scientific studies have linked coal mining to declines in birds, fish, salamanders, crayfish, insects and freshwater mussels. More than 1 million acres of hardwood forest and more than 2,000 miles of streams have already been destroyed by surface coal mining in Appalachia.

Mining also threatens nearby communities with air and water pollution and risk of flooding. More than 20 peer-reviewed scientific studies have now linked mining pollution in Appalachia to health problems, including increased risk of disease and birth defects.

Hollywood Hot Spot; 2019 

September 

13, Full Moon, 9:32pm

14, 12-7pm 17th Annual TARFEST at the tar pits

There’s a few people we can think of we’d like to throw in here, but of course, we will not as we don’t litter.  We do love the SMELL of the tar here, reminds us of that broken glass, grit, dirt and hot tar burning under I-90 and LSD (Lake Shore Drive) in those hot summer days in Chicago on the way cruising to see Ministry and more.

“Always FREE the 17th Annual TARFEST Celebrates the Art & Music of LA w/ KCRW DJs, Natural History Museum, Second Home & Local Artists.  On  September 14, LA hipsters are invited to dance the day away with a lineup of KCRW DJs, while artists including Johnny KMNDZ Rodriguez and Mr. B Baby paint live murals around the park. In addition to the expanded programming for installation art, the Serpentine Pavilion at Second Home can be experienced for free by everyone who attends the festival.  TARFEST’s longtime partner, the Natural History Museum of LA County, will also be open for FREE all day, allowing attendees to flow freely from art and music to immersion in geological history.”

28, Super New Moon, 11:26am

October 

ANNA UDDENBERG: PRIVÉ
Through December 1 at Marciano Art Foundation: Privé, the first solo show in Los Angeles and first institutional show in the United States by the Berlin-based Swedish artist Anna Uddenberg, is currently on view in MAF’s Lounge Gallery. Through the lens of the feedback loop that is social media, Uddenberg analyzes systems of representation, the performativity of femme expressions and its cross-connection to consumer culture and gender studies. Her interest in femme as figuration is geared towards exploring power dynamics in the service domain, and disputes the idea of femininity by revealing what happens when these roles are amplified and over-performed to a degree of uncanny absurdity.

1, Banks, Palladium

6, 1334 with GD Quartet, echoplex

13, Full Moon, 2:07pm

14, Columbus–did NOT discover America–Day

19, The Broad will debut a new survey of internationally renowned artist Shirin Neshat’s approximately 30-year career. Shirin Neshat: I Will Greet the Sun Again presents over 230 photographs and eight immersive video installations, offering a rare glimpse into the evolution of Neshat’s artistic journey as she explores topics of exile, displacement, and identity with beauty, dynamic formal invention, and poetic grace. The exhibition features the global debut of Land of Dreams, an ambitious new project encompassing a body of photographs and two videos, and includes her early photograph series, Women of Allah (1993-97), iconic video works such as Rapture (1999), Turbulent (1998), and Passage (2001), and monumental photography installations including The Book of Kings (2012) and The Home of My Eyes (2015).

23, Downtown LA Film Festival

24, Subhumans, Crisis Point West, Glass House

26, Ra Ra Riot, Glass House

27, Marc Almond, The Palace

Theatre of Hate, Jay Aston (acoustic) Echoplex

31, Halloween, MIR (Mercury in Retrograde)

All videos are owned and copyrighted by their respective artists and labels, used with kind courtesy of the artists, labels, or publicists. This pages textual content ONLY is anti-copyright 2019, if re-printing, must provide link back to this site or you will be taken blindfolded to Area 51 to never return.

Hollywood Forever

 

Image: Jean Luc Godard with Cinematographer Anthony B. Richmond.  Image used with kind courtesy of The British Film Institute, and with kind courtesy of Mr. Richmond for The Hollywood Sentinel. British Film Institute:  http://www.bfi.org.uk/

Jean Luc Godard; one of the most iconic filmmakers of all time, is pictured above with the legendary cinematographer Anthony B. Richmond.  Both are featured in this special issue of The Hollywood Sentinel, with an exclusive interview with Mr. Richmond found on our “Backstage Hollywood” page, and our review of Godard’s film lensed by Mr. Richmond, “One Plus One,” on our “Art in Los Angeles” page.

Also at the top of our “Art in Los Angeles” page, be sure to check out the review of art critic Jerry Saltz by fine artist and Hollywood Sentinel art writer Moira Cue.  This, and much more can be found in the pages here of Hollywood Sentinel, where each week, we bring you ONLY the good news in the world of art and entertainment.

Life in L.A. 

Never a dull moment, life in Los Angeles is an exciting, adventure filled time.  With the best in the world of entertainment, nightlife, dining, and cultural events to choose from; Los Angeles County also has some of the world’s greatest surf, beaches, campgrounds, hiking trails, mountains, and more.

This month, as most of the world knows, has been a very challenging time for our great land of California.  With many  fires raging for weeks across the State of California, burning nearly a quarter million acres of land, and displacing reportedly over 300,000 people across the State, with over 100 still missing, and over 50 lives lost, the fires in California this year were simply among the worst.

My usual beautiful drive down PCH in Malibu turned heartbreaking, with many hills and mountains filled with fresh green grass, trees, and homes, reduced to splotchy shades of brown, gray, and black ash, burned to the ground.

Thankfully, the majority of Malibu is still standing, as beautiful as ever, as is the majority of California’s amazing forests. Even the town of Paradise, California, which was essentially entirely destroyed by the Camp Fire, has already vowed to rebuild.

Even moments after the biggest obstacles, or the worst tragedies, human beings vow to fight and survive, rebuild from their loss, and turn things back around. Such is the nature in us all–to fight to live, to be victorious, to beat disaster.

It doesn’t have to take a near brush with death to shake us out of our routine and ignite a fighting spirit to conquer and succeed within us. This is who we are. Not as California’s; Not as Americans; but as human beings on this planet Earth. It is our human nature to not only survive, but to thrive.

We need not wait for adversity, fear, or doom to raise our spirit. We have the same soul within us. We need only to awaken it, to shake it free.

Get outside today and do something to get your pulse racing; to remind yourself that you really ARE alive. You are a part of the beat of this universe. You are a part of the pulse of life and the energy on this Earth. Find your passion, follow your purpose, and make it a life worth living.  This is YOUR time NOW. Make it count!

Enjoy the new issue.

–Bruce Edwin
This content is copyright 2018, Hollywood Sentinel, all world rights reserved.

Jerry Saltz at The Broad

by Moira Cue

Sing, O goddess, the anger of Achilles son of Peleus….

– Homer’s Iliad

I’ve been thinking this week about the rationing of cruelty.

We are told it is ok to euthanize pets, but wrong to euthanize our grandmothers. Which do we love more? Is it more cruel to squeeze the last moments of life from a sentient being who is in terrible pain, or to say, “You’ve had enough?”

How many artists hear of 7-figure sales and think, “It should be me,” and what percentage of those ever get there? What percentage of those who do “make it” had class advantages to begin with? Does struggle make an artist stronger, or does it destroy great art before it is made? Is it kinder to pour weed killer all over an artist’s fragile ego, or mete out cruel truths in small rations….(?)

Jerry Saltz, the Pulitzer-Prize winning art critic, was at The Broad today.  I was there.

Artist Moira Cue with Jerry Saltz at The Broad. Photo Credit: Jared Hedler, 2018.

I was so excited to meet Jerry that I woke up several hours too early with too little sleep under my belt. I recently started following him on Instagram—Jerry, who was once a truck driver, makes my heart pitter-patter with the glee that you feel when someone says out-loud things that you are “not supposed” to say. Overproduction. Hype. Idiocy foisted to the moneyed class as avant-garde. Dirty little secrets.

I’m not saying Saltz’s tell-it-like-it-is style makes him the DJT of the art world. (Or does it? Jerry let us know several times this morning that he is a sociopath. My analysis of Trump is that his narcissism is a dangerously benign mask for his core disorder, sociopathy. Resist_Persist_Repeat)

Side note: An Excerpt from Quora Answer to “How do psychopaths and sociopaths think?” (Courtesy Simon Chatzigiannis)
“Make a plan and execute it. If you don’t exploit people, they will exploit you. That is the way that the world works, and I will stand by that. And it stinks, it stinks so bad, but in order to play, you gotta fight fire with fire. You can’t just back down. You gotta play dirty.”

He continues, “There is no such things as morals. People talk all the time about morals. There’s no morals. Nothing’s right, nothing’s wrong. It is all perception, it is all you perceive. Don’t let anybody tell you anything else. Every situation is different. It is not all black and white.”

For the record, I do not endorse a Machiavellian ethos. Nothing is more destructive in the long run than the abandonment of one’s moral code in the pursuit of power.

When I found out, through Instagram, that Jerry would be at The Broad in Los Angeles, instead of applying for a press pass, I paid $150 to get in. I was afraid tickets would sell out. The man is a rock star.

Jerry was across the street when I arrived, either getting coffee or water. I wanted to be sure he could find convenience store coffee, and I don’t recall our exchange except that he said the word “boom.” I was so groggy I couldn’t process language. There are mostly European-style cafes near The Broad, and the best coffee places (Barista Society, For Five, and Nossa Familia) are closed Saturday. But Jerry drinks American coffee, the 7-11 stuff. If you follow him on Instagram, you’ll see the “Big Gulp” featured prominently.

Anyway, after saying hello, Jerry left while the crowd assembled. Then he came back. We all were admitted with wristbands, and waited for stragglers to show up in the lobby (there were a few nice women there I made friends with immediately).  And then Jerry began his “overly long introduction” and labeled us all vampires. We were game. Following the Pied Piper. He told us he hated all of us. I don’t care about any of you, just the stuff you make. Somehow he deduced that the crowd would be full of artists. No one disabused him of the notion.

The Broad, photo credit: Moira Cue, 2018.

CUT TO: The Lobby, Below the Escalator (Jerry declared this area the museum’s duodenum, due to its unique architectural attributes). Just for the occasion, I was wearing my “love” earring on one ear and my “hate” earring on the other. Jerry pretended to monologue as if he was a painting. “Come here….” The painting plays a game of mystery and seduction.

The Broad, Photo Credit: Moira Cue, 2018

According to Jerry, cities vote Democratic because love is the glue that keeps our innate hostility from taking over. Whereas, in flyover country, people are so far apart they don’t have to use love as a connective tissue. The hostility hardens to hate, and they vote Republican. (His words, not mine, but I’ve bastardized them completely.)

Photo Credit: Moira Cue

Next week, he tells us, he will publish a numbered list of rules in New York Magazine. He will return to this topic to let us know the list includes “Though shalt not envy…” At the top of the escalator we are greeted by a big shiny Koons. I thought the subject was balloons, but they’re called tulips. They looked exactly like tulips made out of those long skinny balloons though, not real tulips, but oversized balloon tulips cast in a reflective stainless steel.

I think of Koons as a big balloon.  And I think how these are the works that attract people who only go to museums to take selfies in front of the art. And I can’t get past the wall that says “means of production is mine,” and I don’t like bright shiny objects. I like dirty, broken objects. Stains on sidewalks. Displays of dexterity. Things with layers. But we say nice things in The Hollywood Sentinel, that’s our schtick. So kudos to Koons for positioning and marketing himself so well. It’s not an easy accomplishment.

To consider Koons in the best light, I should ponder the artist’s generosity and glee. (When my cat brings the severed head of a mouse, I know she means well.) Knowing that Koons experiences pleasure from things that repel me (plastic toys, artificial things, etc.) I can consider that perhaps in the giving of what is beloved, his intentions are kind. I had never thought of that before. This is Jerry’s influence. He also writes that what we hate in another artist’s work is often something inside of us. Which gives pause to consideration.

 

Jerry addressed us as devotees, as children, and, worst of all, as *aspiring artists.* And by worst of all, I mean, it felt like one of those Hollywood parties that doubles as an open call. Where you know someone who was invited by a friend of a friend will embarrass himself and try to give the host a headshot.

So, we started with Koons, and then we discussed Mehretu, Bradford, and market corrections regarding women and people of color in the art world. I think he overstated the good news for women and POC’s. (Out of the 100 most expensive paintings ever sold at auction, not a single female artist is represented.) He talked about market corrections, and we didn’t get into the role of historical excavation. But based on his statements on Hilma Af Klint, I know he’s thought about the issue.

Next we visited a Warhol room.

“What do you see? I want you to see the subject and not see the subject.”

“What is the subject?” “How is this created?”

He talked about Warhol as a train that rattled the tracks. Warhol shook everything.

In the next room he talked about Johns, who dreamt he painted the American flag, and woke up, and painted the flag. When asked about the materials, an audience member pointed out that encaustic won’t bleed colors. I said encaustic also served as an adhesive to hold the newspaper to the canvas. Jerry went after Mehretu (again). He said her thoughts about diaspora weren’t embedded in the work. Ouch.

And this is a whole other topic, where social issues are used to justify an artist making whatever type of work she wants. Does the text used to market the work actually relate to the work? (Or, in the words of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy CEU I was listening to at 3:00 am recently, is language the cause of suffering? Why do we rely on words to validate pictures?)

I digress.

Recently, I saw the work of an artist of Middle Eastern descent. These were luxurious semi-Westernized nude figures in the Persian miniature tradition, but large scale, on fine linen. The accompanying booklet of text contained a didactic lecture about the refugee crisis. Of course we all care about refugees, but the artist insisted on a non-existent relationship. All I could do was inwardly roll my eyes, and leave. [End rant.]

Jerry mentioned that he could take Mehretu’s work, put it in another gallery, and tell us it was a third-string AbEx artist from the fifties. I.e. She was “thinking about the diaspora” my -ss.

We moved on to Ellsworth Kelly (shape and color; eliminate the artist’s hand) and he asked me to stop answering questions and give someone else a turn. This, of course, was embarrassing. Luckily I wear big girl panties now. So no biggie.

Jerry Saltz, Photo Credit: Moira Cue, 2018

Channeling Doris Lessing, The Golden Notebook:
Somewhere around the third or fourth time Jerry used the word sociopath, after Ellsworth Kelly, I began to wonder if I was a sociopath, or a conditional sociopath, a compartmentalized sociopath. Is it fun to be a sociopath? How can I be a sociopath if I’m also an empath? Is the empathy I display “displayed empathy”? What if there’s another layer of me that has no empathy? Is art a no-empathy zone in my life? Is empathy a form of cruelty? I started to feel like I was wearing myself in layers. This hysterical panic lasted a full forty-five seconds.

Then, Ed Ruscha. We looked at Norms on Fire. We talked about LA cool. We talked about working outdoors, being outdoors, Pop art and the everyday. Then we moved on to Anselm Kiefer.

We completely ignored Beuys(!)

Our path also avoided many Lichtenstein’s, and Barbara Kruger. And that giant table and chairs that people always take pictures of themselves under.

The Kiefer was not a particularly good one (compared to the rest of his oeuvre). It was done in charcoal and light washes (Jerry thinks he did rubbings, but I respectfully posit the grainlines in the wood are created via draftsmanship; the perspective gives it away). This painting, Deutschlands Geisteshelden (Germany’s spiritual heroes) visits the theme of post-war German identity. I think Nürnberg, also in the Broad collection, but not currently on display, is a better painting. Kiefer is best doing what he is known for—tactile surfaces, layers of paint three inches deep. But Jerry wanted to talk about what if your parents were Nazis. Can good people love bad people?

By the time we got to Kiefer, the museum had opened, and a troop of Brownies wandered through. “How do we get out?” Jerry asked. “Through Twombly!” I replied. Of course. I’d forgotten to shut up. He said he wasn’t going to talk about Twombly. We were probably 45 minutes over our allotted time by that point. But he couldn’t help himself. He asked us about Twombly’s pencil scrawls of genitals or hearts; love or war, and he talked about how real Twombly’s vulnerability was. Radical vulnerability. He announced we’d wrap up with selfies for everyone, and I blurted out that we’d missed Basquiat.

Jean-Paul, I’m sorry. It was not to be.

Last stop, Kara Walker. Jerry made white girls in nice clothes say dirty words. “What is going on here? I want you to SAY IT OUTLOUD.” Kara, like Mehretu, was his student at RISD. Even then, she was doing cutouts. When Jerry first saw her, he looked over her shoulder chills went up and down his spine and electricity through his head and he said to himself, “I’m not going to say anything to this artist and f— it up.” Speaking of f bombs, he also said we should all have a sign over our studio door. The sign over his typewriter says, “I’m not going to f— it up again this time.” (Something like that.)

And then, the lecture concluded and we were given an opportunity to ask questions. One young lady (in a leopard print jumpsuit) for some reason, maybe the Beatles effect, looked like she was about to cry. She asked about the gallery system, mega-galleries, etc. Another woman asked about pricing, and mentioned her work had been at Basel, but didn’t sell. Tough break. Jerry started talking about Koons again. In the early days, Koons price gouged himself and sold work at a loss. He sacrificed his children. “Anything you do, any price you pay, for your art is ok!”

In front of Lari Pittman, we took selfies.

I waited to be last, and then I hated the way the picture turned out, and hated myself for posing for a photo with Jerry like a groupie. Jerry said “You did good,” which translates to “you talk a lot,” and then he said “You’re a real artist,” and I said, “whatever.” Then I all but ran out of the museum with my hair on fire, as shocked at the word “whatever” coming out of my mouth as I was when my eighty-plus year old father used it.

Outside, I had a cup of tea. I sat near the grass, after trying to talk to another troupe of Brownies who were offended because they were actually Girl Scouts and I didn’t know the difference. I thought Brownies wore brown and Girl Scouts wore green. But these Girl Scouts wore brown and didn’t look any older than the Brownies. So I stuck to singing “Leaving on a Jet Plane” along with a sidewalk musician:
So kiss me and smile for me
Tell me that you’ll wait for me
Hold me like you’ll never let me go …

… then went back to pay my respect to Basquiat. And I thought about the question I’d asked, back at Walker, about the arc of a painter’s career. And my follow up question, what about the roses? Who gets better with time? Hodgkin, who else? Most all of them get worse, or plateau, at best. What about Twombly’s roses? I’m not sold, but I can’t write them off. They’re stuck in my craw.

The Twombly room has the iconic neutral palette work, sculptures that no one looks at, and one of the late roses, with an inscription. I had asked Jerry what he thought about the roses, and Jerry asked me what I thought, before saying “color is good” and they’re “a little dry.” At least I think it was a little dry, or, something to that effect.

I’ve read the glowing reviews but I’m not fully sold. Did Twombly go Pop at the end? Is that it?

I went back again, to this painting, to look for Twombly in Twombly and I see he’s already left us. Someone else is there instead. Is this really a burst of bloom or an obtuse inaccessibility—the moment of being so present that one is gone, the point in the Monad where fullness and nothingness, yin and yang, emerge from each other? Do we assign false significance to late work, or do we attack it because we no longer understand it? Roses are loaded. Are these too grandiose a farewell, or betting the House one last time and failing? Again, I return to the idea that he’s suddenly integrated the Pop movement into his signature style. The Twombly roses remind me of Warhol’s flowers.

Rose V, at The Broad, contains the following inscription of a section of a poem by Rilke:

Infinitely at ease
despite so many risks,
with no variation
of her usual routine,
the blooming rose is the omen
of her immeasurable endurance.

Jerry Saltz, Photo Credit: Moira Cue, 2018

I watched a pretty little girl, no more than eight, pose in front of the painting. Once she knew it was a painting of roses, she liked it. And I remembered suddenly I’d also made an appointment to see a video installation by Jordan Wolfson, called “Female Figure.” I signed up on a whim, because I tried to walk in and couldn’t, and the attendant told me to come back in 15 minutes when there was a spot open due to cancellation.

I enter this room and the first thing I see is a stripper, who turns out to be a robot. You might be confused if you were only looking at her rear end. She’s very life-like. And the voice in the sound installation says, “My mother’s dead, my father’s dead, I’m gay, I’d like to be a poet. This is my house.” Our stripper wears a green mask with the visage of an evil witch, and she twerks to dance music, and makes eye contact, and tells you what to do.

You kind of had to be there.

This content is ©2018, Moira Cue, Hollywood Sentinel, all world rights reserved.